open access

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)
Review paper
Published online: 2018-04-30
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The role of new adipokines in gestational diabetes mellitus pathogenesis

Radzisław Mierzyński1, Elżbieta Poniedziałek-Czajkowska1, Dominik Dłuski1, Bożena Leszczyńska-Gorzelak1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0038
·
Pubmed: 29781079
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(4):222-227.
Affiliations
  1. Chair and Department of Obstetrics and Perinatology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland, Jaczewskiego 8, 20-954 Lublin, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-04-30

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition dur­ing pregnancy. Explanation of the GDM pathogenesis is important due to preventing gestational complications. During pregnancy there are significant changes in maternal metabolism. Many of these changes are influenced by different adi­pokines produced in the placenta and adipose tissue. The exact role of adipokines in the pathogenesis of GDM remains still unknown. Several adipokines have been analysed throughout gestation and their levels have been suggested as biomarkers of maternal–perinatal outcomes. Some of them have been postulated as significant in the pathogenesis of pregnancy complications like GDM. This report aims to review some of the recent topics of adipokine research that may be of particular importance in patho­physiology and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus. Because of manuscript length limitations, after thorough literature review and in view of the recent evidence, we focus on the one of the most well-known adipokine: adiponectin, and not so well-studied: nesfatin-1, chemerin, ghrelin, and CTRP 1.

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition dur­ing pregnancy. Explanation of the GDM pathogenesis is important due to preventing gestational complications. During pregnancy there are significant changes in maternal metabolism. Many of these changes are influenced by different adi­pokines produced in the placenta and adipose tissue. The exact role of adipokines in the pathogenesis of GDM remains still unknown. Several adipokines have been analysed throughout gestation and their levels have been suggested as biomarkers of maternal–perinatal outcomes. Some of them have been postulated as significant in the pathogenesis of pregnancy complications like GDM. This report aims to review some of the recent topics of adipokine research that may be of particular importance in patho­physiology and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus. Because of manuscript length limitations, after thorough literature review and in view of the recent evidence, we focus on the one of the most well-known adipokine: adiponectin, and not so well-studied: nesfatin-1, chemerin, ghrelin, and CTRP 1.

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Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus, adiponectin, nesfatin-1, chemerin, ghrelin, CTRP 1

About this article
Title

The role of new adipokines in gestational diabetes mellitus pathogenesis

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

222-227

Published online

2018-04-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0038

Pubmed

29781079

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(4):222-227.

Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus
adiponectin
nesfatin-1
chemerin
ghrelin
CTRP 1

Authors

Radzisław Mierzyński
Elżbieta Poniedziałek-Czajkowska
Dominik Dłuski
Bożena Leszczyńska-Gorzelak

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