open access

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)
Review paper
Published online: 2018-04-30
Get Citation

Prediction of preeclampsia developing at term

Iulia Huluta1, Anca Maria Panaitescu12
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0037
·
Pubmed: 29781078
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(4):218-221.
Affiliations
  1. “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
  2. Filantropia Clinical Hospital, Bucharest, Bld Ion Mihalache nr 11, Romania

open access

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-04-30

Abstract

Preterm preeclampsia (PE), occurring at < 37 weeks’ gestation, can be predicted from as early as 11–13 weeks and prevented with the use of aspirin. In contrast, term PE, which is more common than preterm-PE and it can be associated with important maternal morbidity and mortality, cannot be effectively predicted at 11–13 weeks and cannot be prevented by the prophy­lactic use of aspirin. This paper briefly reviews the pathogenesis of term PE and discusses strategies available for its prediction.   

Abstract

Preterm preeclampsia (PE), occurring at < 37 weeks’ gestation, can be predicted from as early as 11–13 weeks and prevented with the use of aspirin. In contrast, term PE, which is more common than preterm-PE and it can be associated with important maternal morbidity and mortality, cannot be effectively predicted at 11–13 weeks and cannot be prevented by the prophy­lactic use of aspirin. This paper briefly reviews the pathogenesis of term PE and discusses strategies available for its prediction.   

Get Citation

Keywords

preeclampsia, aspirin, pravastatin, SFLT-1, PLGF

About this article
Title

Prediction of preeclampsia developing at term

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

218-221

Published online

2018-04-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0037

Pubmed

29781078

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(4):218-221.

Keywords

preeclampsia
aspirin
pravastatin
SFLT-1
PLGF

Authors

Iulia Huluta
Anca Maria Panaitescu

References (27)
  1. Say L, Chou D, Gemmill A, et al. Global causes of maternal death: a WHO systematic analysis. Lancet Glob Health. 2014; 2(6): e323–e333.
  2. O'Gorman N, Wright D, Syngelaki A, et al. Competing risks model in screening for preeclampsia by maternal factors and biomarkers at 11-13 weeks gestation. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 214(1): 103.e1–103.e12.
  3. O'Gorman N, Wright D, Syngelaki A, et al. A competing risks model in early screening for preeclampsia. Fetal Diagn Ther. 2012; 32(3): 171–178.
  4. Akolekar R, Syngelaki A, Sarquis R, et al. Prediction of early, intermediate and late pre-eclampsia from maternal factors, biophysical and biochemical markers at 11-13 weeks. Prenat Diagn. 2011; 31(1): 66–74.
  5. von Dadelszen P, Magee LA, Roberts JM. Subclassification of preeclampsia. Hypertens Pregnancy. 2003; 22(2): 143–148.
  6. Rolnik DL, Wright D, Poon LC, et al. Aspirin versus Placebo in Pregnancies at High Risk for Preterm Preeclampsia. N Engl J Med. 2017; 377(7): 613–622.
  7. Roberge S, Bujold E, Nicolaides KH. Aspirin for the prevention of preterm and term preeclampsia: systematic review and metaanalysis. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2017; pii: S0002. 9378; 17: 32326–8.
  8. Cantwell R, Clutton-Brock T, Cooper G, et al. Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006-2008. The Eighth Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. BJOG. 2011; 118 Suppl 1: 1–203.
  9. Lisonkova S, Sabr Y, Mayer C, et al. Maternal morbidity associated with early-onset and late-onset preeclampsia. Obstet Gynecol. 2014; 124(4): 771–781.
  10. Raymond D, Peterson E. A critical review of early-onset and late-onset preeclampsia. Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2011; 66(8): 497–506.
  11. Orabona R, Donzelli CM, Falchetti M, et al. Placental histological patterns and uterine artery Doppler velocimetry in pregnancies complicated by early or late pre-eclampsia. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 47(5): 580–585.
  12. Redman C. Pre-eclampsia: A complex and variable disease. Pregnancy Hypertension. 2014; 4(3): 241–242.
  13. Hung TH, Hsieh TT, Chen SF. Risk of abnormal fetal growth in women with early- and late-onset preeclampsia. Pregnancy Hypertens. 2017 [Epub ahead of print].
  14. Bahado-Singh RO, Syngelaki A, Mandal R, et al. Metabolomic determination of pathogenesis of late-onset preeclampsia. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2017; 30(6): 658–664.
  15. Erez O, Romero R, Maymon E, et al. The prediction of late-onset preeclampsia: Results from a longitudinal proteomics study. PLoS One. 2017; 12(7): e0181468.
  16. Kwiatkowski S, Dołęgowska B, Kwiatkowska E, et al. Do the physiological aging of the placenta and the changes in angiogenesis marker sFlt-1 and PlGF concentrations predispose patients to late-onset preeclampsia? J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2017 [Epub ahead of print]: 1–10.
  17. Litwińska E, Litwińska M, Oszukowski P, et al. Biochemical markers in screening for preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. Ginekol Pol. 2015; 86(8): 611–615.
  18. Vaddamani S, Keepanasseril A, Pillai AA, et al. Maternal cardiovascular dysfunction in women with early onset preeclampsia and late onset preeclampsia: A cross-sectional study. Pregnancy Hypertens. 2017; 10: 247–250.
  19. Wikström AK, Larsson A, Eriksson UJ, et al. Placental growth factor and soluble FMS-like tyrosine kinase-1 in early-onset and late-onset preeclampsia. Obstet Gynecol. 2007; 109(6): 1368–1374.
  20. Redman C. Diagnostic and predictive accuracy of placental growth factor in suspected pre-eclampsia. Pregnancy Hypertens. 2014; 4(3): 241.
  21. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2016). Diagnostic Guideline number 23. PlGF-based testing to help diagnose suspected pre-eclampsia.
  22. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2010). Hypertension in pregnanacy.
  23. O'Gorman N, Wright D, Poon LC, et al. Multicenter screening for pre-eclampsia by maternal factors and biomarkers at 11-13 weeks' gestation: comparison with NICE guidelines and ACOG recommendations. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2017; 49(6): 756–760.
  24. Gallo DM, Wright D, Casanova C, et al. Competing risks model in screening for preeclampsia by maternal factors and biomarkers at 19-24 weeks' gestation. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 214(5): 619.e1–619.e17.
  25. Tsiakkas A, Saiid Y, Wright A, et al. Competing risks model in screening for preeclampsia by maternal factors and biomarkers at 30-34 weeks' gestation. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 215(1): 87.e1–87.e17.
  26. Andrietti S, Silva M, Wright A, et al. Competing-risks model in screening for pre-eclampsia by maternal factors and biomarkers at 35-37 weeks' gestation. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 48(1): 72–79.
  27. Panaitescu AM, Wright D, Militello A, et al. Proposed clinical management of pregnancies after combined screening for pre-eclampsia at 35-37 weeks' gestation. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2017; 50(3): 383–387.

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl