open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-03-30
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The role of the gynaecologist in the promotion and maintenance of oral health during pregnancy

Angelika Kobylińska1, Nicole Sochacki-Wójcicka2, Natalia Dacyna3, Magdalena Trzaska3, Anna Zawadzka3, Dariusz Gozdowski4, Mirosław Wielgoś2, Dorota Olczak-Kowalczyk1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0021
·
Pubmed: 29664546
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(3):120-124.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  2. 1st Clinic and Department of Obestrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  3. Student’s Scientific Club, Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  4. Department of Experimental Design and Bioinformatics, Faculty of Agriculture and Biology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-03-30

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess routine dental examination attendance of pregnant women and a possible impact of gynaecological referrals on the attendance rate.

Material and methods: An electronic survey was conducted that was inclusive of women up to 5 years following delivery. The questions related to socio-demographic data, the course of pregnancy and childbirth, and visits to dental office during pregnancy. For statistical analysis, the authors utilized the chi-square test, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient and odds ratios. A significance level of 0.05 has been assumed.

Results: A total of 3455 questionnaires were analyzed encompassing women aged 13.1–45.4 years. The respondents were on average 1.78 ± 1.44 years after childbirth. The population comprises of women in 59.1% from large cities, in 74.8% with higher education and in 41% with good socio-economic status. A total of 62.3% of women from the study population have visited a dentist for a routine dental examination. Gynaecologists have given a simple referral to a dentist to 17.6% of all women. 45.9% of them were further requested to provide back the feedback of their dental consultation. Dental appoint­ments were upheld by 87.3% of referred women and by 56.9% of those without a referral (OR = 5.20 (4.05–6.67); p < 0.001). Among those who were referred, dental appointments were upheld in 91.7% of cases when further asked to provide oral health feedback and in 83.5% of cases in absence of such further request (OR = 2.19 (1.3–3.66); p = 0.003).

Conclusions: It was determined that referrals from a gynaecologist, and associated oral health feedback requests increase the frequency of abiding to dental appointments during pregnancy. As such, it is necessary to increase the involvement of gynaecologists in the promotion and maintenance of perinatal oral health.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess routine dental examination attendance of pregnant women and a possible impact of gynaecological referrals on the attendance rate.

Material and methods: An electronic survey was conducted that was inclusive of women up to 5 years following delivery. The questions related to socio-demographic data, the course of pregnancy and childbirth, and visits to dental office during pregnancy. For statistical analysis, the authors utilized the chi-square test, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient and odds ratios. A significance level of 0.05 has been assumed.

Results: A total of 3455 questionnaires were analyzed encompassing women aged 13.1–45.4 years. The respondents were on average 1.78 ± 1.44 years after childbirth. The population comprises of women in 59.1% from large cities, in 74.8% with higher education and in 41% with good socio-economic status. A total of 62.3% of women from the study population have visited a dentist for a routine dental examination. Gynaecologists have given a simple referral to a dentist to 17.6% of all women. 45.9% of them were further requested to provide back the feedback of their dental consultation. Dental appoint­ments were upheld by 87.3% of referred women and by 56.9% of those without a referral (OR = 5.20 (4.05–6.67); p < 0.001). Among those who were referred, dental appointments were upheld in 91.7% of cases when further asked to provide oral health feedback and in 83.5% of cases in absence of such further request (OR = 2.19 (1.3–3.66); p = 0.003).

Conclusions: It was determined that referrals from a gynaecologist, and associated oral health feedback requests increase the frequency of abiding to dental appointments during pregnancy. As such, it is necessary to increase the involvement of gynaecologists in the promotion and maintenance of perinatal oral health.

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Keywords

oral health, pregnancy, dental care attendance, gynaecologists

About this article
Title

The role of the gynaecologist in the promotion and maintenance of oral health during pregnancy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

120-124

Published online

2018-03-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0021

Pubmed

29664546

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(3):120-124.

Keywords

oral health
pregnancy
dental care attendance
gynaecologists

Authors

Angelika Kobylińska
Nicole Sochacki-Wójcicka
Natalia Dacyna
Magdalena Trzaska
Anna Zawadzka
Dariusz Gozdowski
Mirosław Wielgoś
Dorota Olczak-Kowalczyk

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