open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-02-28
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The prevelance of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes detected by PCR in women with normal and abnormal cervico-vaginal cytology

Fatma Beyazit1, Fatma Sılan1, Meryem Gencer1, Buket Aydin1, Barış Paksoy1, Mesut A. Unsal1, Ozturk Ozdemir1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0011
·
Pubmed: 29512809
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(2):62-67.
Affiliations
  1. Canakkale 18 Mart University, 17100 Canakkale, Turkey

open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-02-28

Abstract

Objectives: Cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer for women worldwide with a great proportion proved to be related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. As infection with HPV is the strongest risk factor for cervical neoplasia, detection of HPV genotypes in cervical and vaginal specimens of women with normal and abnormal cytology seems to be of paramount importance in cervical cancer screening. The objective of the study is to evaluate the prevalence and HPV genotypes among women with normal or abnormal Pap smear tests.

Material and methods: This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care university hospital in western Turkey. A total of 201 patients in whom both HPV typing and Pap test was performed between 2012 and 2016 in our obstetrics and gynecology department were enrolled in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained for all participants. Cervical smears of the patients were classified by the Bethesda system and HPV analyses were done using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

Results: This study included 201 women, 72 of whom had normal and 129 of whom had abnormal Pap smear results. HPV DNA was detected in 91 (45.2%) of the 201 investigated women. Out of 72 patients with normal cervico-vaginal cytology, HPV positivity was detected in 35 (49%) patients, whereas 33 (35%) patients out of 94 with ASCUS , 18 (62%) patients out of 29 with LSIL and 5 (83%) patients out of 6 with HSIL had HPV positivity. Out of 35 HPV positive women that had normal pap test results, 25 (75%) were found to have high risk HPV (HR-HPV) genotypes. In women with ASCUS, LSIL and HSIL, HR-HPV genotype rates were found to be 94%, 89% and 100% respectively. The most common identified HPV types were HPV58, HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV11 and HPV35.

Conclusions: The frequency of HPV infection was found to be higher in our study compared to previous reports. Moreover, although HR-HPV genotypes were also detected in patients with normal cervical cytology, a majority of patients with HR-HPV genotypes were associated with abnormal cervical smear cytology including high rates of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

Abstract

Objectives: Cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer for women worldwide with a great proportion proved to be related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. As infection with HPV is the strongest risk factor for cervical neoplasia, detection of HPV genotypes in cervical and vaginal specimens of women with normal and abnormal cytology seems to be of paramount importance in cervical cancer screening. The objective of the study is to evaluate the prevalence and HPV genotypes among women with normal or abnormal Pap smear tests.

Material and methods: This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care university hospital in western Turkey. A total of 201 patients in whom both HPV typing and Pap test was performed between 2012 and 2016 in our obstetrics and gynecology department were enrolled in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained for all participants. Cervical smears of the patients were classified by the Bethesda system and HPV analyses were done using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

Results: This study included 201 women, 72 of whom had normal and 129 of whom had abnormal Pap smear results. HPV DNA was detected in 91 (45.2%) of the 201 investigated women. Out of 72 patients with normal cervico-vaginal cytology, HPV positivity was detected in 35 (49%) patients, whereas 33 (35%) patients out of 94 with ASCUS , 18 (62%) patients out of 29 with LSIL and 5 (83%) patients out of 6 with HSIL had HPV positivity. Out of 35 HPV positive women that had normal pap test results, 25 (75%) were found to have high risk HPV (HR-HPV) genotypes. In women with ASCUS, LSIL and HSIL, HR-HPV genotype rates were found to be 94%, 89% and 100% respectively. The most common identified HPV types were HPV58, HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV11 and HPV35.

Conclusions: The frequency of HPV infection was found to be higher in our study compared to previous reports. Moreover, although HR-HPV genotypes were also detected in patients with normal cervical cytology, a majority of patients with HR-HPV genotypes were associated with abnormal cervical smear cytology including high rates of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

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Keywords

Cervical cancer, Pap smear, squamous intraepithelial lesion

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Title

The prevelance of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes detected by PCR in women with normal and abnormal cervico-vaginal cytology

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 2 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

62-67

Published online

2018-02-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0011

Pubmed

29512809

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(2):62-67.

Keywords

Cervical cancer
Pap smear
squamous intraepithelial lesion

Authors

Fatma Beyazit
Fatma Sılan
Meryem Gencer
Buket Aydin
Barış Paksoy
Mesut A. Unsal
Ozturk Ozdemir

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