open access

Vol 89, No 1 (2018)
Review paper
Published online: 2018-01-31
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Child sexual abuse as an etiological factor of overweight and eating disorders — considerations for primary health care providers

Justyna Opydo-Szymaczek1, Grażyna Jarząbek-Bielecka2, Witold Kędzia2, Maria Borysewicz-Lewicka1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0009
·
Pubmed: 29411347
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(1):48-54.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  2. Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Gynecology Clinic, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Polna 33, 60-535 Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 1 (2018)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-01-31

Abstract

Despite the recognition of the clinical importance of child sexual abuse, primary health care providers are often not ad­equately prepared to perform medical evaluations and diagnose child sexual maltreatment. Paper presents basic symptoms and signs of CSA, which may suggest the need for further patient’s diagnosis and referral. Since the great majority of sexually abused children do not have any abnormal physical findings, special attention is paid to the silent warning signs of CSA, such as changes in attitude towards own body and eating habits. Numerous studies suggest that victims of CSA may develop obesity or eating disorders of various forms and intensities.

Abstract

Despite the recognition of the clinical importance of child sexual abuse, primary health care providers are often not ad­equately prepared to perform medical evaluations and diagnose child sexual maltreatment. Paper presents basic symptoms and signs of CSA, which may suggest the need for further patient’s diagnosis and referral. Since the great majority of sexually abused children do not have any abnormal physical findings, special attention is paid to the silent warning signs of CSA, such as changes in attitude towards own body and eating habits. Numerous studies suggest that victims of CSA may develop obesity or eating disorders of various forms and intensities.

Get Citation

Keywords

child sexual abuse, overweight, eating disorders, primary care physician

About this article
Title

Child sexual abuse as an etiological factor of overweight and eating disorders — considerations for primary health care providers

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 1 (2018)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

48-54

Published online

2018-01-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0009

Pubmed

29411347

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(1):48-54.

Keywords

child sexual abuse
overweight
eating disorders
primary care physician

Authors

Justyna Opydo-Szymaczek
Grażyna Jarząbek-Bielecka
Witold Kędzia
Maria Borysewicz-Lewicka

References (35)
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