open access

Vol 88, No 12 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-12-29
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What influences women’s contraceptive choice? A cross-sectional study from Turkey

Ilker Kahramanoglu, Merve Baktiroglu, Hasan Turan, Ozge Kahramanoglu, Fatma Ferda Verit, Oguz Yucel
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0115
·
Pubmed: 29303220
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(12):639-646.

open access

Vol 88, No 12 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-12-29

Abstract

Objectives: In our study, we tried to investigate the determinants of women’s choices about contraception with the aim of discovering whether or not there is a difference in their preferences before and after consultation with a gynaecologist. Material and methods: A total of 1058 women were enrolled. They were given detailed information regarding contraception and contraceptive methods. Subsequently, a survey which was made of 21 questions was administered. Results: Contraceptive counselling significantly changed the contraceptive choice of women. However, influences from social media and friends, their partners and religious belief affected their contraceptive choices. Significant differences in contraceptive choice were observed when women were categorized according to their marital status, education level, household income, age, and number of children. Conclusions: Although contraceptive counselling influenced Turkish women’s choices, there were still other determinants like social media and input from outside sources such as clerics and husbands, which should be overcome.

Abstract

Objectives: In our study, we tried to investigate the determinants of women’s choices about contraception with the aim of discovering whether or not there is a difference in their preferences before and after consultation with a gynaecologist. Material and methods: A total of 1058 women were enrolled. They were given detailed information regarding contraception and contraceptive methods. Subsequently, a survey which was made of 21 questions was administered. Results: Contraceptive counselling significantly changed the contraceptive choice of women. However, influences from social media and friends, their partners and religious belief affected their contraceptive choices. Significant differences in contraceptive choice were observed when women were categorized according to their marital status, education level, household income, age, and number of children. Conclusions: Although contraceptive counselling influenced Turkish women’s choices, there were still other determinants like social media and input from outside sources such as clerics and husbands, which should be overcome.
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Keywords

combined oral contraceptive, condom, contraception, intrauterine device, tubal ligation

About this article
Title

What influences women’s contraceptive choice? A cross-sectional study from Turkey

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 12 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

639-646

Published online

2017-12-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0115

Pubmed

29303220

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(12):639-646.

Keywords

combined oral contraceptive
condom
contraception
intrauterine device
tubal ligation

Authors

Ilker Kahramanoglu
Merve Baktiroglu
Hasan Turan
Ozge Kahramanoglu
Fatma Ferda Verit
Oguz Yucel

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