open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-02-28
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Planning and preparation for pregnancy among women with and without a history of infertility

Natalia Ignaszak-Kaus1, Katarzyna Ozegowska1, Piotr Piekarski2, Leszek Pawelczyk1, Piotr Jędrzejczak1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0013
·
Pubmed: 29512811
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(2):74-79.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Infertility and Reproductive Endocrinology, Poznan University of Medical Sciencec, Polna 33, 60-535 Poznan, Poland
  2. Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Fredry 10, 61-701 Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-02-28

Abstract

Objectives: Preconception counseling, maternal health-related habits, diet, folic acid consumption, substances abuse, may all impact the outcome of pregnancy. The aim of this study was to compare the planning and preparation for pregnancy among pregnant women with and without infertility.

Material and methods: A survey of health behaviors prior to and during pregnancy that could affect pregnancy outcomes, including laboratory tests performed, stimulant usage, initiation of prenatal care, and folic acid intake, was conducted among 400 pregnant women. The study group included 121 women (30.25%) diagnosed with prior infertility, while the control group included 279 women (69.74%) who did not report any problems conceiving.

Results: All patients (100%) from the study group and 70,97% from the control group planned their pregnancy(p < 0.0001). Patients in the study group performed significantly more laboratory tests prior to pregnancy, including: complete blood count, urine analysis, fasting blood glucose concentration, testing for toxoplasmosis, and Pap smear, compared with the control group (p < 0.0001). There was no difference between groups regarding the knowledge of when and why folic acid supplementation is required (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Effective education of women, regarding pregnancy planning and behaviours, that may impact pregnancy outcome is still a serious challange to public health in Poland. Our study indicates that reaching general population with the education is most important to achieve best results in preconceptional care.

Abstract

Objectives: Preconception counseling, maternal health-related habits, diet, folic acid consumption, substances abuse, may all impact the outcome of pregnancy. The aim of this study was to compare the planning and preparation for pregnancy among pregnant women with and without infertility.

Material and methods: A survey of health behaviors prior to and during pregnancy that could affect pregnancy outcomes, including laboratory tests performed, stimulant usage, initiation of prenatal care, and folic acid intake, was conducted among 400 pregnant women. The study group included 121 women (30.25%) diagnosed with prior infertility, while the control group included 279 women (69.74%) who did not report any problems conceiving.

Results: All patients (100%) from the study group and 70,97% from the control group planned their pregnancy(p < 0.0001). Patients in the study group performed significantly more laboratory tests prior to pregnancy, including: complete blood count, urine analysis, fasting blood glucose concentration, testing for toxoplasmosis, and Pap smear, compared with the control group (p < 0.0001). There was no difference between groups regarding the knowledge of when and why folic acid supplementation is required (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Effective education of women, regarding pregnancy planning and behaviours, that may impact pregnancy outcome is still a serious challange to public health in Poland. Our study indicates that reaching general population with the education is most important to achieve best results in preconceptional care.

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Keywords

infertility, pregnancy planning, folic acid, prevention

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About this article
Title

Planning and preparation for pregnancy among women with and without a history of infertility

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 2 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

74-79

Published online

2018-02-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0013

Pubmed

29512811

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(2):74-79.

Keywords

infertility
pregnancy planning
folic acid
prevention

Authors

Natalia Ignaszak-Kaus
Katarzyna Ozegowska
Piotr Piekarski
Leszek Pawelczyk
Piotr Jędrzejczak

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