open access

Vol 88, No 10 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-10-31
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Dysregulation of microRNAs in triple-negative breast cancer

Sylwia Paszek, Natalia Gabło, Edyta Barnaś, Małgorzata Szybka, Jan Morawiec, Agnieszka Kołacińska, Izabela Zawlik
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0097
·
Pubmed: 29192413
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(10):530-536.

open access

Vol 88, No 10 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-10-31

Abstract

Objectives: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with limited treatment options and poor prognosis. TNBC is usually diagnosed at a relatively young age and is characterized by high risk of developing metastases. Some epigenetic regulation of gene expression is associated with TNBC. Expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) can serve as a potential tool for identifying critical biomarkers in TNBC. The aim of our study is to examine expression of selected miRNAs in TNBC and to assess the relationship between miRNA expression and clinicopathological factors.

Material and methods: Expression levels of 19 selected miRNAs were compared between cancerous and normal breast tissues by use of qPCR method. We have evaluated the relationship between the expression level of miRNAs and clinicopathological factors such as: age, tumor size and lymph node status.

Results: We found that in TNBC tissues, when compared with normal breast tissues, the expression of miR-190a, miR- 136-5p and miR-126-5p was significantly reduced (p = 0.0041, p = 0.0007, p = 0.0007, respectively) whereas expression of miR-135b-5p and miR-182-5p was significantly increased (p = 0.0194, p = 0.0041, respectively). We found a linear trend for tumor size and expression of miR-126-5p (p = 0.0296) and miR-135b-5p (p = 0.0241).

Conclusions: Our study confirms that miRNA expression profile is dysregulated in TNBC patients compared to healthy controls. MiR-190a, miR-136-5p, miR-126-5p, miR-135b-5p and miR-182-5p may be associated with development and progression of TNBC

Abstract

Objectives: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with limited treatment options and poor prognosis. TNBC is usually diagnosed at a relatively young age and is characterized by high risk of developing metastases. Some epigenetic regulation of gene expression is associated with TNBC. Expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) can serve as a potential tool for identifying critical biomarkers in TNBC. The aim of our study is to examine expression of selected miRNAs in TNBC and to assess the relationship between miRNA expression and clinicopathological factors.

Material and methods: Expression levels of 19 selected miRNAs were compared between cancerous and normal breast tissues by use of qPCR method. We have evaluated the relationship between the expression level of miRNAs and clinicopathological factors such as: age, tumor size and lymph node status.

Results: We found that in TNBC tissues, when compared with normal breast tissues, the expression of miR-190a, miR- 136-5p and miR-126-5p was significantly reduced (p = 0.0041, p = 0.0007, p = 0.0007, respectively) whereas expression of miR-135b-5p and miR-182-5p was significantly increased (p = 0.0194, p = 0.0041, respectively). We found a linear trend for tumor size and expression of miR-126-5p (p = 0.0296) and miR-135b-5p (p = 0.0241).

Conclusions: Our study confirms that miRNA expression profile is dysregulated in TNBC patients compared to healthy controls. MiR-190a, miR-136-5p, miR-126-5p, miR-135b-5p and miR-182-5p may be associated with development and progression of TNBC

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Keywords

TNBC, microRNA expression, biomarkers

About this article
Title

Dysregulation of microRNAs in triple-negative breast cancer

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 10 (2017)

Pages

530-536

Published online

2017-10-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0097

Pubmed

29192413

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(10):530-536.

Keywords

TNBC
microRNA expression
biomarkers

Authors

Sylwia Paszek
Natalia Gabło
Edyta Barnaś
Małgorzata Szybka
Jan Morawiec
Agnieszka Kołacińska
Izabela Zawlik

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