open access

Vol 88, No 8 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-08-31
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Comparison of whole genome expression profile between preterm and full-term newborns

Przemko Kwinta, Renata Bokiniec, Mirosław Bik-Multanowski, Clara-Cecilie Gunther, Agnieszka Grabowska, Teofila Książek, Anna Madetko-Talowska, Katarzyna Szewczyk, Monika Szwarc-Duma, Maria K. Borszewska-Kornacka, Lars O. Baumbusch, Cecilie Revhaug, Ola D. Saugstad, Jacek J. Pietrzyk
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0080
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(8):434-441.

open access

Vol 88, No 8 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-08-31

Abstract

Objectives: Evaluate the time dependent expression of genes in preterm neonates and verify the influence of ontogenic maturation and the environmental factors on the gene expression after birth. Material and methods: The study was carried out on 20 full-term newborns and 62 preterm newborns (mean birth weight = 1002 [g] (SD: 247), mean gestational age = 27.2 weeks (SD: 1.9)). Blood samples were drawn from all the study participants at birth and at the 36th week postmenstrual age from the preterm group to assess whole genome expression in umbilical cord blood and in peripheral blood leukocytes, respectively. (SurePrint G3 Human Gene Expression v3, 8x60K Microarrays (Agilent)).

Results: A substantial number of genes was found to be expressed differentially at the time of birth and at 36 PMA in comparison to the term babies with more genes being down-regulated than up-regulated. However, the fold change in the majority of cases was < 2.0. Extremely preterm and very preterm infants were characterized by significantly down-regulated cytokine and chemokine related pathways. The number of down-regulated genes decreased and number of up-regulated genes increased at 36 PMA vs. cord blood. There were no specific gene expression pathway profiles found within the groups of different gestational ages.

Conclusions: Preterm delivery is associated with a different gene expression profile in comparison to term delivery. The gene expression profile changes with the maturity of a newborn measured by the gestational age.

Abstract

Objectives: Evaluate the time dependent expression of genes in preterm neonates and verify the influence of ontogenic maturation and the environmental factors on the gene expression after birth. Material and methods: The study was carried out on 20 full-term newborns and 62 preterm newborns (mean birth weight = 1002 [g] (SD: 247), mean gestational age = 27.2 weeks (SD: 1.9)). Blood samples were drawn from all the study participants at birth and at the 36th week postmenstrual age from the preterm group to assess whole genome expression in umbilical cord blood and in peripheral blood leukocytes, respectively. (SurePrint G3 Human Gene Expression v3, 8x60K Microarrays (Agilent)).

Results: A substantial number of genes was found to be expressed differentially at the time of birth and at 36 PMA in comparison to the term babies with more genes being down-regulated than up-regulated. However, the fold change in the majority of cases was < 2.0. Extremely preterm and very preterm infants were characterized by significantly down-regulated cytokine and chemokine related pathways. The number of down-regulated genes decreased and number of up-regulated genes increased at 36 PMA vs. cord blood. There were no specific gene expression pathway profiles found within the groups of different gestational ages.

Conclusions: Preterm delivery is associated with a different gene expression profile in comparison to term delivery. The gene expression profile changes with the maturity of a newborn measured by the gestational age.

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Keywords

transcriptome, very low birth weight, cord blood

About this article
Title

Comparison of whole genome expression profile between preterm and full-term newborns

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 8 (2017)

Pages

434-441

Published online

2017-08-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0080

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(8):434-441.

Keywords

transcriptome
very low birth weight
cord blood

Authors

Przemko Kwinta
Renata Bokiniec
Mirosław Bik-Multanowski
Clara-Cecilie Gunther
Agnieszka Grabowska
Teofila Książek
Anna Madetko-Talowska
Katarzyna Szewczyk
Monika Szwarc-Duma
Maria K. Borszewska-Kornacka
Lars O. Baumbusch
Cecilie Revhaug
Ola D. Saugstad
Jacek J. Pietrzyk

References (17)
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