open access

Vol 88, No 8 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-08-31
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Intake of folic acid by Polish women with higher education — a survey research: can we do more?

Malwina Pietrzykowska-Kuncman12, Dorota Zasina-Olaszek1, Kuncman Łukasz3, Marta Niedźwiecka1, Krzysztof Szaflik4, Iwona Maroszyńska1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0079
·
Pubmed: 28930369
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(8):428-433.
Affiliations
  1. Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital Research Institute. Department of Intensive Care and Congenital Malformations of Newborns and Infants., Rzgowska Street 281/289, 93-338 Łódź, Poland
  2. Medical University of Lodz. Department of Pediatric Didactics., Rzgowska Street 281/289, 93-338 Łódź, Poland
  3. Medical University of Lodz. The Department of Radiotherapy., Pabianicka Street 62, 93-513 Łódź, Poland
  4. Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital Research Institute. Department of Gynecology, Fertility and Fetal Therapy., Rzgowska Street 281/289, 93-338 Łódź, Poland

open access

Vol 88, No 8 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-08-31

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of the study is to determine efficacy of the Primary Prevention Program of Neural Tube Defects in Polish women with higher education in 5-year interval.

Material and methods: Survey research was conducted twice (in 2008 and 2013) in 630 female students of universities: 305 female medical students and 325 female non-medical students. The survey was also done among women aged 27– 35 who graduated from medical or non-medical universities and have at least one child. Questions concerned knowledge about prophylaxis and periconceptional folic acid intake. Chi square test was used to assess the significance.

Results: Knowledge concerning prophylaxis was significantly higher in female medical students comparing to non-medical ones, both in 2008 (p < 0,001), and in 2013 (p < 0,001). 92.9% in 2008 and 93.9% in 2013 of medical students knew about the necessity of periconceptional folic acid intake. Awareness of female non-medical students was lower (2008 — 35.3% and 2013 — 41.1%) and did not change in the 5-year long period (p = 0.3). There was no significant difference in preconceptional folic acid intake among mothers with medical and non-medical education (53.3% vs. 45% p = 0.4). However, the highest folic acid intake was among mothers –medical doctors who treat children with neural tube defect.

Conclusions: Difference between medical and non-medical students shows that better educational programs may improve knowledge about prophylaxis. Aside from knowledge, compliance with recommendations of Primary Prevention Program of Neural Tube Defects is unsatisfactory.

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of the study is to determine efficacy of the Primary Prevention Program of Neural Tube Defects in Polish women with higher education in 5-year interval.

Material and methods: Survey research was conducted twice (in 2008 and 2013) in 630 female students of universities: 305 female medical students and 325 female non-medical students. The survey was also done among women aged 27– 35 who graduated from medical or non-medical universities and have at least one child. Questions concerned knowledge about prophylaxis and periconceptional folic acid intake. Chi square test was used to assess the significance.

Results: Knowledge concerning prophylaxis was significantly higher in female medical students comparing to non-medical ones, both in 2008 (p < 0,001), and in 2013 (p < 0,001). 92.9% in 2008 and 93.9% in 2013 of medical students knew about the necessity of periconceptional folic acid intake. Awareness of female non-medical students was lower (2008 — 35.3% and 2013 — 41.1%) and did not change in the 5-year long period (p = 0.3). There was no significant difference in preconceptional folic acid intake among mothers with medical and non-medical education (53.3% vs. 45% p = 0.4). However, the highest folic acid intake was among mothers –medical doctors who treat children with neural tube defect.

Conclusions: Difference between medical and non-medical students shows that better educational programs may improve knowledge about prophylaxis. Aside from knowledge, compliance with recommendations of Primary Prevention Program of Neural Tube Defects is unsatisfactory.

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Title

Intake of folic acid by Polish women with higher education — a survey research: can we do more?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 8 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

428-433

Published online

2017-08-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0079

Pubmed

28930369

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(8):428-433.

Keywords

transcripto

Authors

Malwina Pietrzykowska-Kuncman
Dorota Zasina-Olaszek
Kuncman Łukasz
Marta Niedźwiecka
Krzysztof Szaflik
Iwona Maroszyńska

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