open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)
Review paper
Published online: 2017-06-30
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Biological markers with potential clinical value in endometrial cancer — review of the literature

Nadia Taoussi1, Ali Alghamdi2, Konrad Futyma2, Tomasz Rechberger2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0062
·
Pubmed: 28727134
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(6):331-336.
Affiliations
  1. 2nd Department of Gynecology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland, Poland
  2. 2nd Department of Gynecology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland

open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-06-30

Abstract

Endometrial carcinoma (EC) is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract encountered in western countries, making it the fourth most common cancer in women. The incidence of uterine cancer is on the rise throughout the developed world where diagnosis is increasingly observed among younger patients. With regard to this, attention has been focused on conducting more studies to achieve a better understanding of the molecular genetics related to endometrial carcinogenesis. Over the years, EC has been classified into two broad histopathological subtypes based on the mechanism of development, and we can therefore observe specific biomarkers related to the respective subtype. Based on this idea, more research has been carried out in the last decade, using biotechnological methods, with the aim to identify new potential tumor markers. By translating these findings into clinical use one may facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognostic prediction, and contribute to individualized treatment. Without a doubt, there is a demanding need to identify biomarkers that can be adopted in clinical practice in order to reduce the time needed to obtain diagnosis. Such markers may be of great value in improving patient outcome. However, a number of problems remain to be solved before this becomes a reality. This paper briefly reviews the current status of rising biomarkers in EC.

Abstract

Endometrial carcinoma (EC) is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract encountered in western countries, making it the fourth most common cancer in women. The incidence of uterine cancer is on the rise throughout the developed world where diagnosis is increasingly observed among younger patients. With regard to this, attention has been focused on conducting more studies to achieve a better understanding of the molecular genetics related to endometrial carcinogenesis. Over the years, EC has been classified into two broad histopathological subtypes based on the mechanism of development, and we can therefore observe specific biomarkers related to the respective subtype. Based on this idea, more research has been carried out in the last decade, using biotechnological methods, with the aim to identify new potential tumor markers. By translating these findings into clinical use one may facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognostic prediction, and contribute to individualized treatment. Without a doubt, there is a demanding need to identify biomarkers that can be adopted in clinical practice in order to reduce the time needed to obtain diagnosis. Such markers may be of great value in improving patient outcome. However, a number of problems remain to be solved before this becomes a reality. This paper briefly reviews the current status of rising biomarkers in EC.

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Keywords

endometrial cancer, array-based technology, proteomics, gene expression, prognostic markers, screening method

About this article
Title

Biological markers with potential clinical value in endometrial cancer — review of the literature

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

331-336

Published online

2017-06-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0062

Pubmed

28727134

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(6):331-336.

Keywords

endometrial cancer
array-based technology
proteomics
gene expression
prognostic markers
screening method

Authors

Nadia Taoussi
Ali Alghamdi
Konrad Futyma
Tomasz Rechberger

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