open access

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-07-31
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The analysis of repeatability and reproducibility of bladder neck mobility measurements obtained during pelvic floor sonography performed introitally with 2D transvaginal probe

Edyta Wlaźlak1, Tomasz Kluz2, Jacek Kociszewski3, Karolina Frachowicz1, Magdalena Janowska1, Wiktor Wlaźlak1, Grzegorz Surkont1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0068
·
Pubmed: 28819940
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(7):360-365.
Affiliations
  1. Clinic of Operative Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, 1st Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Chopin Hospital of Rzeszow, Poland
  3. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Lutheran Hospital Hagen-Haspe, Hagen, Germany

open access

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-07-31

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was the evaluation of repeatability and reproducibility of chosen urethral neck mobility measurements obtained during introital pelvic floor sonography performed with a 2D transvaginal probe.

Material and methods: In order to assess the repeatability and reproducibility, independent measurements on the ultra­sound image were taken by two specialists on 92 female patients at rest and at strain (Valsalva maneuver). 2D ultrasound examination was performed introitally with a transvaginal probe (PFS-TV). The location of the urethral internal orifice was defined with coordinates of two points. Point CI marks the urethral anterior edge visualized on ultrasound as closer to the pubic symphysis. Point CII marks the posterior edge visualized more peripherally from pubic symphysis.

Results: Repeatability and reproducibility measurements of point CI location and mobility were good and very good (0.6710–0.9961), while of point CII — were medium, good and very good (0.5738–0.9944). Point CI was clearly visible in all cases. It was not possible to accurately mark point CII in 4.3–17.4% of cases.

Conclusions: The possibility to visualize point CI in every single case with very good and good repeatability and reproduc­ibility of measurements of this point’s location and mobility allows the usage of CI point as a universal reference point for evaluation of bladder neck mobility and position during PFS-TV in the clinical practice and for research purposes.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was the evaluation of repeatability and reproducibility of chosen urethral neck mobility measurements obtained during introital pelvic floor sonography performed with a 2D transvaginal probe.

Material and methods: In order to assess the repeatability and reproducibility, independent measurements on the ultra­sound image were taken by two specialists on 92 female patients at rest and at strain (Valsalva maneuver). 2D ultrasound examination was performed introitally with a transvaginal probe (PFS-TV). The location of the urethral internal orifice was defined with coordinates of two points. Point CI marks the urethral anterior edge visualized on ultrasound as closer to the pubic symphysis. Point CII marks the posterior edge visualized more peripherally from pubic symphysis.

Results: Repeatability and reproducibility measurements of point CI location and mobility were good and very good (0.6710–0.9961), while of point CII — were medium, good and very good (0.5738–0.9944). Point CI was clearly visible in all cases. It was not possible to accurately mark point CII in 4.3–17.4% of cases.

Conclusions: The possibility to visualize point CI in every single case with very good and good repeatability and reproduc­ibility of measurements of this point’s location and mobility allows the usage of CI point as a universal reference point for evaluation of bladder neck mobility and position during PFS-TV in the clinical practice and for research purposes.

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Keywords

urogynecology, pelvic floor ultrasound, transvaginal probe, urethral mobility, repeatability

About this article
Title

The analysis of repeatability and reproducibility of bladder neck mobility measurements obtained during pelvic floor sonography performed introitally with 2D transvaginal probe

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

360-365

Published online

2017-07-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0068

Pubmed

28819940

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(7):360-365.

Keywords

urogynecology
pelvic floor ultrasound
transvaginal probe
urethral mobility
repeatability

Authors

Edyta Wlaźlak
Tomasz Kluz
Jacek Kociszewski
Karolina Frachowicz
Magdalena Janowska
Wiktor Wlaźlak
Grzegorz Surkont

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