open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-06-30
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Is unexplained elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein still important predictor for adverse pregnancy outcome?

Derya Başbuğ1, Alper Başbuğ2, Cavidan Gülerman
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0061
·
Pubmed: 28727133
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(6):325-330.
Affiliations
  1. Private Clinic, Duzce, Turkey, Turkey
  2. Düzce University, Faculty of Medicine, Duzce, Turkey, Turkey

open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-06-30

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determined the predictive value of maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) as a marker for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Material and methods: This study was carried out at Dr. Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Education and Research Hospital between 2009 and 2010. This study included a total of 1,177 pregnant women, including 170 in the study group and 1,007 in the control group. Pregnancy outcomes and characteristics were analyzed with regard to the MSAFP value.

Results: Gestational week, birth weight and APGAR scores were significantly lower in the elevated MSAFP group (p < 0.001). Adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), oligohydramnios and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) rates were increased in the elevated MSAFP group.

Conclusions: Although ultrasound outweighs as a screening method for neural tube defects and non-invasive prenatal testing outweighs for aneuploidy screening MSAFP level in the second trimester is still an important predictor for poor maternal/fetal outcomes.

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determined the predictive value of maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) as a marker for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Material and methods: This study was carried out at Dr. Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Education and Research Hospital between 2009 and 2010. This study included a total of 1,177 pregnant women, including 170 in the study group and 1,007 in the control group. Pregnancy outcomes and characteristics were analyzed with regard to the MSAFP value.

Results: Gestational week, birth weight and APGAR scores were significantly lower in the elevated MSAFP group (p < 0.001). Adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), oligohydramnios and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) rates were increased in the elevated MSAFP group.

Conclusions: Although ultrasound outweighs as a screening method for neural tube defects and non-invasive prenatal testing outweighs for aneuploidy screening MSAFP level in the second trimester is still an important predictor for poor maternal/fetal outcomes.

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Keywords

alpha-fetoprotein, adverse pregnancy outcome, prenatal tests

About this article
Title

Is unexplained elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein still important predictor for adverse pregnancy outcome?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

325-330

Published online

2017-06-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0061

Pubmed

28727133

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(6):325-330.

Keywords

alpha-fetoprotein
adverse pregnancy outcome
prenatal tests

Authors

Derya Başbuğ
Alper Başbuğ
Cavidan Gülerman

References (20)
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