open access

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-07-31
Get Citation

Maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy at 39 weeks and beyond with mild gestational diabetes mellitus

Hanqing Chen, Suhua Zou, Jianbo Yang, Songqing Deng, Jian Cai, Zilian Wang
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0069
·
Pubmed: 28819941
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(7):366-371.

open access

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-07-31

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus at 39 weeks compared to 40 weeks.

Material and methods: Clinical data of 372 cases of mild gestational diabetes mellitus form First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University were analyzed retrospectively. There were 108 mild GDM patients that delivered at 40–40+6 weeks in our research group, and 264 patients that delivered in 39–39+6 weeks in the control group. Neonatal and maternal outcomes were compared between the two groups.

Results: There was no difference between the two groups in the rate of cesarean section (42.6% vs. 45.5%, p = 0.614). The incidence of large for gestational age between the two groups was also not different (11.1% vs. 10.6%, p = 0.887). The rate of postpartum hemorrhage and shoulder dystocia of the two groups was not different either (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the incidence of fetal distress, neonatal asphyxia, neonatal pathological jaundice, neonatal hypoglycemia, and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in the two groups (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: There were no significant differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes and neonatal outcomes in women with mild gestational diabetes between deliveries at 39 and 40 weeks.

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus at 39 weeks compared to 40 weeks.

Material and methods: Clinical data of 372 cases of mild gestational diabetes mellitus form First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University were analyzed retrospectively. There were 108 mild GDM patients that delivered at 40–40+6 weeks in our research group, and 264 patients that delivered in 39–39+6 weeks in the control group. Neonatal and maternal outcomes were compared between the two groups.

Results: There was no difference between the two groups in the rate of cesarean section (42.6% vs. 45.5%, p = 0.614). The incidence of large for gestational age between the two groups was also not different (11.1% vs. 10.6%, p = 0.887). The rate of postpartum hemorrhage and shoulder dystocia of the two groups was not different either (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the incidence of fetal distress, neonatal asphyxia, neonatal pathological jaundice, neonatal hypoglycemia, and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in the two groups (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: There were no significant differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes and neonatal outcomes in women with mild gestational diabetes between deliveries at 39 and 40 weeks.

Get Citation

Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus, cesarean section, large for gestational age

About this article
Title

Maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy at 39 weeks and beyond with mild gestational diabetes mellitus

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

366-371

Published online

2017-07-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0069

Pubmed

28819941

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(7):366-371.

Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus
cesarean section
large for gestational age

Authors

Hanqing Chen
Suhua Zou
Jianbo Yang
Songqing Deng
Jian Cai
Zilian Wang

References (19)
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