open access

Vol 88, No 9 (2017)
Review paper
Published online: 2017-09-29
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Selected trace elements concentrations in pregnancy and their possible role — literature review

Iwona Lewicka, Rafał Kocyłowski, Mariusz Grzesiak, Zuzanna Gaj, Przemysław Oszukowski, Joanna Suliburska
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0093
·
Pubmed: 29057438
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(9):509-514.

open access

Vol 88, No 9 (2017)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-09-29

Abstract

The aim of this study was to review the role of selected trace elements in pregnancy and fetal development. Citations related to the role of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) during pregnancy were searched in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, using keywords and MeSH terms. Inadequate supply of trace elements can cause abnormalities of fetal development and predispose a child to disorders later on in life. Trace elements are the key elements of complex enzymes responsible for the modulation of the antioxidant defense system of the organism. It has been suggested that there is a correlation between reduced levels of trace elements essential for antioxidant function in the body of pregnant women, and an increased risk of developing preeclampsia. Trace elements are components of numerous regulatory enzymes and hormones essential to the division and differentiation of fetal cells and their further development. Mineral deficiencies in pregnant women can cause birth defects of the central nervous system, and growth disorders. Future research should be directed to explain the interaction between trace elements, and establish the optimum levels of macro and micronutrients supplementation, as well as determine the reference values for trace elements in the maternal serum, umbilical cord blood and amniotic fluid.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to review the role of selected trace elements in pregnancy and fetal development. Citations related to the role of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) during pregnancy were searched in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, using keywords and MeSH terms. Inadequate supply of trace elements can cause abnormalities of fetal development and predispose a child to disorders later on in life. Trace elements are the key elements of complex enzymes responsible for the modulation of the antioxidant defense system of the organism. It has been suggested that there is a correlation between reduced levels of trace elements essential for antioxidant function in the body of pregnant women, and an increased risk of developing preeclampsia. Trace elements are components of numerous regulatory enzymes and hormones essential to the division and differentiation of fetal cells and their further development. Mineral deficiencies in pregnant women can cause birth defects of the central nervous system, and growth disorders. Future research should be directed to explain the interaction between trace elements, and establish the optimum levels of macro and micronutrients supplementation, as well as determine the reference values for trace elements in the maternal serum, umbilical cord blood and amniotic fluid.

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Keywords

pregnancy, trace elements, fetal development, preeclampsia, growth disorders, iron, zinc, manganese, copper, selenium

About this article
Title

Selected trace elements concentrations in pregnancy and their possible role — literature review

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 9 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

509-514

Published online

2017-09-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0093

Pubmed

29057438

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(9):509-514.

Keywords

pregnancy
trace elements
fetal development
preeclampsia
growth disorders
iron
zinc
manganese
copper
selenium

Authors

Iwona Lewicka
Rafał Kocyłowski
Mariusz Grzesiak
Zuzanna Gaj
Przemysław Oszukowski
Joanna Suliburska

References (30)
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