open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-04-28
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Premature fetal tissues are possible source of valuable mesenchymal stem cells

Filip Andrzej Dąbrowski, Anna Burdzinska, Agnieszka Kulesza, Beata Kaleta, Leszek Pączek, Mirosław Wielgoś
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0037
·
Pubmed: 28509320
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(4):191-197.

open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-04-28

Abstract

Objectives: Comparison of the ability to inhibit alloactivated lymphocytes proliferation of human Wharton Jelly (WJ) and amniotic membrane (AM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from preterm and term pregnancies.

Material and methods: Term-WJ-MSCs (n = 5) and Preterm-WJ-MSCs (n = 1) were obtained from tissue explants by adherent method. Term-AM-MSCs (n = 5) and Preterm-AM-MSCs (n = 1) were obtained by tripsin and collagenase digestion method. Term and Preterm MSCs phenotype was confirmed in vitro by flow cytometry. To evaluate the potential of fetal and adult MSCs to diminish immunological response mixed lymphocytes reaction (MLR) has been performed.

Results: Term and Preterm cells were positively identified as MSCs by the expression of CD73 and CD90 and CD105 with simultaneous absence of CD11b, CD14, CD19, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR. The mean inhibition of allostimulated lymphocytes after addition of fetal derived MSCs amounted 64.8% for term AM-MSCs and 42.1% for term WJ-MSCs (for both populations the effect was statistically significant, p < 0.01). The addition of preterm-MSCs to MLR resulted in reduction of stimulated lymphocytes proliferation by 64.9% for AM-MSCs and 86.1% for WJ-MSCs.

Conclusions: Presented results suggest that preterm fetal tissues contain MSCs which posses similar immunosuppressive capacity as those from term pregnancies. In the future MSCs from the umbilical cord and amnion can be potentially used to prevent immuno-dependent injuries in premature newborns.

Abstract

Objectives: Comparison of the ability to inhibit alloactivated lymphocytes proliferation of human Wharton Jelly (WJ) and amniotic membrane (AM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from preterm and term pregnancies.

Material and methods: Term-WJ-MSCs (n = 5) and Preterm-WJ-MSCs (n = 1) were obtained from tissue explants by adherent method. Term-AM-MSCs (n = 5) and Preterm-AM-MSCs (n = 1) were obtained by tripsin and collagenase digestion method. Term and Preterm MSCs phenotype was confirmed in vitro by flow cytometry. To evaluate the potential of fetal and adult MSCs to diminish immunological response mixed lymphocytes reaction (MLR) has been performed.

Results: Term and Preterm cells were positively identified as MSCs by the expression of CD73 and CD90 and CD105 with simultaneous absence of CD11b, CD14, CD19, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR. The mean inhibition of allostimulated lymphocytes after addition of fetal derived MSCs amounted 64.8% for term AM-MSCs and 42.1% for term WJ-MSCs (for both populations the effect was statistically significant, p < 0.01). The addition of preterm-MSCs to MLR resulted in reduction of stimulated lymphocytes proliferation by 64.9% for AM-MSCs and 86.1% for WJ-MSCs.

Conclusions: Presented results suggest that preterm fetal tissues contain MSCs which posses similar immunosuppressive capacity as those from term pregnancies. In the future MSCs from the umbilical cord and amnion can be potentially used to prevent immuno-dependent injuries in premature newborns.

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Keywords

mesenchymal stem cells, immunomodulation, amnion, umbilical cord, premature delivery

About this article
Title

Premature fetal tissues are possible source of valuable mesenchymal stem cells

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

191-197

Published online

2017-04-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0037

Pubmed

28509320

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(4):191-197.

Keywords

mesenchymal stem cells
immunomodulation
amnion
umbilical cord
premature delivery

Authors

Filip Andrzej Dąbrowski
Anna Burdzinska
Agnieszka Kulesza
Beata Kaleta
Leszek Pączek
Mirosław Wielgoś

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