open access

Vol 88, No 3 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-03-31
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Proliferation and maturation of intratumoral blood vessels in women with malignant ovarian tumors assessed with cancer stem cells marker nestin and platelet derived growth factor PDGF-B

Sylwia Czekierdowska, Norbert Stachowicz, Mieczysław Chróściel, Artur Czekierdowski
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0023
·
Pubmed: 28397199
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(3):120-128.

open access

Vol 88, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-03-31

Abstract

Objectives: Platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) and nestin have been suggested to be useful in the assessment of neoangiogenesis in malignant ovarian masses. We aimed to investigate a possible association of these markers with newly formed microcapillaries and perivascular cells in ovarian tumors.

Material and methods: Microvessel density (MVD) and pericytes were studied in 82 women with ovarian neoplasms, including 7 benign cysts, 7 borderline masses, 64 epithelial ovarian cancers and 4 other malignant ovarian tumors. Immunohistochemical staining included antibodies to CD34, PDGF-B and nestin.

Results: Median values of CD34-positive and nestin-positive MVD were: 24,5 (range:17-32) and 21 (range: 12–31), respectively. No significant correlation between intratumoral CD-34 positive MVD and nestin-positive MVD was found. Benign and borderline lesions more frequently than malignant tumors displayed low or medium values of nestin-positive MVD (p = 0.01). Histological grading of malignant tumors was associated with nestin-positive MVD (p = 0.01). Nestin expression in tumor cells was not correlated with tumor grade or histological subtype. PDGF-B expression was found in tumor microves­sels in 72% of cases (59/82). High expression of PDGF in pericapillary cells was strongly associated with high expression of this marker in cancer cells (p = 0.007). Significant correlations between PDGF-B and nestin expression in malignant tumor microvessels were also found (p = 0.04). Nestin and PDGF-B expressions were strongly associated with high grade tumors when compared to low grade or benign masses.

Conclusions: We conclude that the assessment of PDGF-B and nestin-positive MVD could be used to identify only highly active, angiogenic malignant ovarian masses, where tumor vasculature is formed.

Abstract

Objectives: Platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) and nestin have been suggested to be useful in the assessment of neoangiogenesis in malignant ovarian masses. We aimed to investigate a possible association of these markers with newly formed microcapillaries and perivascular cells in ovarian tumors.

Material and methods: Microvessel density (MVD) and pericytes were studied in 82 women with ovarian neoplasms, including 7 benign cysts, 7 borderline masses, 64 epithelial ovarian cancers and 4 other malignant ovarian tumors. Immunohistochemical staining included antibodies to CD34, PDGF-B and nestin.

Results: Median values of CD34-positive and nestin-positive MVD were: 24,5 (range:17-32) and 21 (range: 12–31), respectively. No significant correlation between intratumoral CD-34 positive MVD and nestin-positive MVD was found. Benign and borderline lesions more frequently than malignant tumors displayed low or medium values of nestin-positive MVD (p = 0.01). Histological grading of malignant tumors was associated with nestin-positive MVD (p = 0.01). Nestin expression in tumor cells was not correlated with tumor grade or histological subtype. PDGF-B expression was found in tumor microves­sels in 72% of cases (59/82). High expression of PDGF in pericapillary cells was strongly associated with high expression of this marker in cancer cells (p = 0.007). Significant correlations between PDGF-B and nestin expression in malignant tumor microvessels were also found (p = 0.04). Nestin and PDGF-B expressions were strongly associated with high grade tumors when compared to low grade or benign masses.

Conclusions: We conclude that the assessment of PDGF-B and nestin-positive MVD could be used to identify only highly active, angiogenic malignant ovarian masses, where tumor vasculature is formed.

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Keywords

ovarian cancer, microvessel desity, nestin, PDGF, pericytes

About this article
Title

Proliferation and maturation of intratumoral blood vessels in women with malignant ovarian tumors assessed with cancer stem cells marker nestin and platelet derived growth factor PDGF-B

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 3 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

120-128

Published online

2017-03-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0023

Pubmed

28397199

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(3):120-128.

Keywords

ovarian cancer
microvessel desity
nestin
PDGF
pericytes

Authors

Sylwia Czekierdowska
Norbert Stachowicz
Mieczysław Chróściel
Artur Czekierdowski

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