open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-04-28
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Effects of 17β-estradioland raloxifene on endothelial OPG and RANKL secretion

Wojciech Karwowski, Katarzyna Lekesiz, Ewa Koc-Żórawska, Krzysztof Wnuczko, Hanna Borysewicz-Sanczyk, Beata Naumnik
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0033
·
Pubmed: 28509316
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(4):167-173.

open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-04-28

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to asses the effects of estradiol vs. raloxifene on the levels of osteoprotegerin and soluble Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor kB Ligand (sRANKL) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) culture in standard and calcifying medium.

Material and methods: Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells were isolated from human umbilical vein by standard method. The supernatant concentrations of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and sRANKL (ELISA) were determined after incubation with glicerophosphate, estradiol , raloxifene, glicerophoshate and estradiol, glicerophosphate and raloxifene in comparison with control group at four designated time points (0, 1, 2 and 4 days of incubation).

Results: Incubation of estradiol with HUVEC colony lowered the OPG level significantly after day 2 and 4. Meantime, the level of sRANKL was stable. Raloxifene added to standard growth medium also significantly lowered OPG concentration after day 4 only, with no impact on sRANKL concentration. When added to calcifying medium, both estradiol and raloxifene significantly changed OPG level during the experiment. In all treated groups OPG levels were lower than in groups exposed to calcifying medium only. Neither estradiol, nor raloxifene changed sRANKL levels during the experiment.

Conclusions: Estradiol and raloxifene affect OPG secretion from endothelial cells in vitro which may suggest their modifying role in pathogenesis of vascular calcification in postmenopausal women

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to asses the effects of estradiol vs. raloxifene on the levels of osteoprotegerin and soluble Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor kB Ligand (sRANKL) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) culture in standard and calcifying medium.

Material and methods: Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells were isolated from human umbilical vein by standard method. The supernatant concentrations of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and sRANKL (ELISA) were determined after incubation with glicerophosphate, estradiol , raloxifene, glicerophoshate and estradiol, glicerophosphate and raloxifene in comparison with control group at four designated time points (0, 1, 2 and 4 days of incubation).

Results: Incubation of estradiol with HUVEC colony lowered the OPG level significantly after day 2 and 4. Meantime, the level of sRANKL was stable. Raloxifene added to standard growth medium also significantly lowered OPG concentration after day 4 only, with no impact on sRANKL concentration. When added to calcifying medium, both estradiol and raloxifene significantly changed OPG level during the experiment. In all treated groups OPG levels were lower than in groups exposed to calcifying medium only. Neither estradiol, nor raloxifene changed sRANKL levels during the experiment.

Conclusions: Estradiol and raloxifene affect OPG secretion from endothelial cells in vitro which may suggest their modifying role in pathogenesis of vascular calcification in postmenopausal women

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Keywords

vascular calcification, OPG, sRANKL, menopause, estrogens, raloxifene

About this article
Title

Effects of 17β-estradioland raloxifene on endothelial OPG and RANKL secretion

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

167-173

Published online

2017-04-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0033

Pubmed

28509316

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(4):167-173.

Keywords

vascular calcification
OPG
sRANKL
menopause
estrogens
raloxifene

Authors

Wojciech Karwowski
Katarzyna Lekesiz
Ewa Koc-Żórawska
Krzysztof Wnuczko
Hanna Borysewicz-Sanczyk
Beata Naumnik

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