open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-04-28
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Polymorphic variants of genes involved in choline pathway and the risk of intrauterine fetal death

Krzysztof Drews, Agata Różycka, Magdalena Barlik, Andrzej Klejewski, Grażyna Kurzawińska, Hubert Wolski, Marian Majchrzycki, Agnieszka Gryszczyńska, Adam Kamiński, Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0039
·
Pubmed: 28509322
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(4):205-211.

open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2017-04-28

Abstract

Objectives: Choline and folate metabolism disturbances may be involved in the occurrence of intrauterine fetal death (IUFD). The proper activity of this metabolism could be determined by genetic variants involved in choline pathway e.g. CHKA (gene encoding choline kinase α), PCYT1A (gene encoding CCTα) and CHDH (gene encoding choline dehydrogenase). Our study aimed at determining the genotype and allele frequencies of CHKA rs7928739, PCYT1A rs712012, PCYT1A rs7639752, CHDH rs893363 and CHDH rs2289205 polymorphisms in mothers with IUFD occurrence.

Material and methods: The study involved 76 mothers with IUFD occurrence and 215 mothers of healthy children. Genetic analysis was performed with the use of PCR/RFLP method.

Results: The frequency of genotypes and alleles of studied polymorphisms was similar in both groups. The study revealed no association of PCYT1A, CHKA and CHDH polymorphisms in analysed groups of women. While evaluating the co-existence of analysed polymorphisms statistically significant correlation was revealed. Co-existence of CHKA rs7928739 AC/CHDH rs2289205 AA genotypes was observed statistically more frequently in the study group than in the control group (p = 0,031).

Conclusions: There is no correlation between single CHKA rs7928739, PCYT1A rs712012, PCYT1A rs7639752, CHDH rs893363 and CHDH rs2289205 polymorphisms and the incidence of intrauterine fetal death. However, revealed statistically significant difference between co-existence of CHKA rs7928739 AC/CHDH rs2289205 AA genotypes between study groups suggest the need of further analysis.

Abstract

Objectives: Choline and folate metabolism disturbances may be involved in the occurrence of intrauterine fetal death (IUFD). The proper activity of this metabolism could be determined by genetic variants involved in choline pathway e.g. CHKA (gene encoding choline kinase α), PCYT1A (gene encoding CCTα) and CHDH (gene encoding choline dehydrogenase). Our study aimed at determining the genotype and allele frequencies of CHKA rs7928739, PCYT1A rs712012, PCYT1A rs7639752, CHDH rs893363 and CHDH rs2289205 polymorphisms in mothers with IUFD occurrence.

Material and methods: The study involved 76 mothers with IUFD occurrence and 215 mothers of healthy children. Genetic analysis was performed with the use of PCR/RFLP method.

Results: The frequency of genotypes and alleles of studied polymorphisms was similar in both groups. The study revealed no association of PCYT1A, CHKA and CHDH polymorphisms in analysed groups of women. While evaluating the co-existence of analysed polymorphisms statistically significant correlation was revealed. Co-existence of CHKA rs7928739 AC/CHDH rs2289205 AA genotypes was observed statistically more frequently in the study group than in the control group (p = 0,031).

Conclusions: There is no correlation between single CHKA rs7928739, PCYT1A rs712012, PCYT1A rs7639752, CHDH rs893363 and CHDH rs2289205 polymorphisms and the incidence of intrauterine fetal death. However, revealed statistically significant difference between co-existence of CHKA rs7928739 AC/CHDH rs2289205 AA genotypes between study groups suggest the need of further analysis.

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Keywords

choline, intrauterine fetal death, genetic polymorphism

About this article
Title

Polymorphic variants of genes involved in choline pathway and the risk of intrauterine fetal death

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 4 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

205-211

Published online

2017-04-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0039

Pubmed

28509322

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(4):205-211.

Keywords

choline
intrauterine fetal death
genetic polymorphism

Authors

Krzysztof Drews
Agata Różycka
Magdalena Barlik
Andrzej Klejewski
Grażyna Kurzawińska
Hubert Wolski
Marian Majchrzycki
Agnieszka Gryszczyńska
Adam Kamiński
Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz

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