open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-06-30
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The incidence of metabolic syndrome in adolescents with different phenotypes of PCOS

Kubra Zengin Altintas1, Berna Dilbaz, Derya Akdag Cirik1, Runa Ozelci, Tuba Zengin, Osman Nuri Erginay, Serdar Dilbaz
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0055
·
Pubmed: 28727126
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(6):289-295.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Etlik Zubeyde Hanım Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, Turkey

open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-06-30

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of metabolic syndrome in Turkish adolescents with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Material and methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on the Youth Center clinic of a tertiary referral hospital in Turkey. Adolescents with PCOS (n = 144) were classified into four phenotype groups according to the presence of oligo/anovulation (O), hyperandrogenism (H), and polycystic ovarian morphology (P) as follows: Phenotype A (O + H + P), Phenotype B (H + O), Phenotype C (H + P), Phenotype D (O + P). The adolescents gave early follicular phase blood samples for endocrine and metabolic tests. The incidence and the presence of parameters of metabolic syndrome were assessed among the four groups.

Results: In total, 54.9% of the adolescents with PCOS were overweight and 25.7% had metabolic syndrome. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in Phenotypes A-D were as follows: 39.5%, 20.5%, 26.5%, and 15.2%, respectively. Although body mass index was higher in the Phenotype A group, insulin resistance was similar in all of the phenotype groups. The most common dyslipidemia was low HDL-C levels and this was present in more than half of the adolescents with PCOS. Both body mass index and total testosterone levels were significantly higher in adolescents with metabolic syndrome in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome.

Conclusions: Although low HDL-C levels and insulin resistance are common PCOS findings in adolescents, the metabolic profile seems to be worse in Phenotype A than the other phenotypes. Therefore, screening programs should evaluate patients based on the known risk factors and phenotypes for adolescents with PCOS.

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of metabolic syndrome in Turkish adolescents with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Material and methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on the Youth Center clinic of a tertiary referral hospital in Turkey. Adolescents with PCOS (n = 144) were classified into four phenotype groups according to the presence of oligo/anovulation (O), hyperandrogenism (H), and polycystic ovarian morphology (P) as follows: Phenotype A (O + H + P), Phenotype B (H + O), Phenotype C (H + P), Phenotype D (O + P). The adolescents gave early follicular phase blood samples for endocrine and metabolic tests. The incidence and the presence of parameters of metabolic syndrome were assessed among the four groups.

Results: In total, 54.9% of the adolescents with PCOS were overweight and 25.7% had metabolic syndrome. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in Phenotypes A-D were as follows: 39.5%, 20.5%, 26.5%, and 15.2%, respectively. Although body mass index was higher in the Phenotype A group, insulin resistance was similar in all of the phenotype groups. The most common dyslipidemia was low HDL-C levels and this was present in more than half of the adolescents with PCOS. Both body mass index and total testosterone levels were significantly higher in adolescents with metabolic syndrome in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome.

Conclusions: Although low HDL-C levels and insulin resistance are common PCOS findings in adolescents, the metabolic profile seems to be worse in Phenotype A than the other phenotypes. Therefore, screening programs should evaluate patients based on the known risk factors and phenotypes for adolescents with PCOS.

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Keywords

adolescents, metabolic syndrome, phenotype, polycystic ovary syndrome

About this article
Title

The incidence of metabolic syndrome in adolescents with different phenotypes of PCOS

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 6 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

289-295

Published online

2017-06-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0055

Pubmed

28727126

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(6):289-295.

Keywords

adolescents
metabolic syndrome
phenotype
polycystic ovary syndrome

Authors

Kubra Zengin Altintas
Berna Dilbaz
Derya Akdag Cirik
Runa Ozelci
Tuba Zengin
Osman Nuri Erginay
Serdar Dilbaz

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