open access

Vol 88, No 2 (2017)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-02-28
Get Citation

Influence of diet on the risk of developing endometriosis

Joanna Jurkiewicz-Przondziono, Magdalena Lemm, Anna Kwiatkowska-Pamuła, Ewa Ziółko, Mariusz K. Wójtowicz
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0017
·
Pubmed: 28326519
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(2):96-102.

open access

Vol 88, No 2 (2017)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-02-28

Abstract

Endometriosis is a hormone-dependent chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of endometrium beyond the uterine cavity. The disease affects 5–15% of women of child-bearing age, 30–50% of whom suffer from infertility. Understanding the role of dietary factors in the development of endometriosis is critical to development of effective dietary instructions for prevention. Existing studies concerning nutrition and endometriosis suggest that diet is a potentially modifiable risk factor for endometriosis. Fruits and vegetables, fish oils, dairy products rich in calcium and vitamin D, and Omega-3 fatty acids are likely connected with a lower risk of developing endometriosis. Risk factors that increase the risk of endometriosis include consumption of products rich in trans-unsaturated fatty acids, consumption of fats generally, and consumption of beef and other kinds of red meat and alcohol. Currently, there are no clear correlations between par­ticular food products and the risk of endometriosis. Further research is needed in order to fully understand the influence of consumed food products on the risk of development of this disease.

Abstract

Endometriosis is a hormone-dependent chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of endometrium beyond the uterine cavity. The disease affects 5–15% of women of child-bearing age, 30–50% of whom suffer from infertility. Understanding the role of dietary factors in the development of endometriosis is critical to development of effective dietary instructions for prevention. Existing studies concerning nutrition and endometriosis suggest that diet is a potentially modifiable risk factor for endometriosis. Fruits and vegetables, fish oils, dairy products rich in calcium and vitamin D, and Omega-3 fatty acids are likely connected with a lower risk of developing endometriosis. Risk factors that increase the risk of endometriosis include consumption of products rich in trans-unsaturated fatty acids, consumption of fats generally, and consumption of beef and other kinds of red meat and alcohol. Currently, there are no clear correlations between par­ticular food products and the risk of endometriosis. Further research is needed in order to fully understand the influence of consumed food products on the risk of development of this disease.

Get Citation

Keywords

endometriosis, diet, risk factors, nutrition

About this article
Title

Influence of diet on the risk of developing endometriosis

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 2 (2017)

Pages

96-102

Published online

2017-02-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0017

Pubmed

28326519

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(2):96-102.

Keywords

endometriosis
diet
risk factors
nutrition

Authors

Joanna Jurkiewicz-Przondziono
Magdalena Lemm
Anna Kwiatkowska-Pamuła
Ewa Ziółko
Mariusz K. Wójtowicz

References (35)
  1. Mier-Cabrera J, Aburto-Soto T, Burrola-Méndez S, et al. Women with endometriosis improved their peripheral antioxidant markers after the application of a high antioxidant diet. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2009; 7: 54.
  2. Donnez J, Squifflet J, Casanas-Roux F, et al. Typical and subtle atypical presentations of endometriosis. Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am. 2003; 30(1): 83–93, viii.
  3. Vinatier D, Orazi G, Cosson M, et al. Theories of endometriosis. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2001; 96(1): 21–34.
  4. Basta A, Brucka A, Górski J, et al. Polish Gynocologic Society Experts Group. [The statement of Polish Society's Experts Group concerning diagnostics and methods of endometriosis treatment]. Ginekol Pol. 2012; 83(11): 871–876.
  5. Bulletti C, Coccia ME, Battistoni S, et al. Endometriosis and infertility. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2010; 27(8): 441–447.
  6. Bianconi L, Hummelshoj L, Coccia ME, et al. Recognizing endometriosis as a social disease: the European Union-encouraged Italian Senate approach. Fertil Steril. 2007; 88(5): 1285–1287.
  7. Missmer SA, Chavarro JE, Malspeis S, et al. A prospective study of dietary fat consumption and endometriosis risk. Hum Reprod. 2010; 25(6): 1528–1535.
  8. Menakaya U, Infante F, Condous G. Consensus on current management of endometriosis. Hum Reprod. 2013; 28(11): 3162–3163.
  9. Simoens S, Dunselman G, Dirksen C, et al. The burden of endometriosis: costs and quality of life of women with endometriosis and treated in referral centres. Hum Reprod. 2012; 27(5): 1292–1299.
  10. Darling AM, Chavarro JE, Malspeis S, et al. A prospective cohort study of Vitamins B, C, E, and multivitamin intake and endometriosis. J Endometr. 2013; 5(1): 17–26.
  11. Missmer SA, Chavarro JE, Malspeis S, et al. A prospective study of dietary fat consumption and endometriosis risk. Hum Reprod. 2010; 25(6): 1528–1535.
  12. Chang SF, Chuang Mh. Factors that affect self-care behaviour of female high school students with dysmenorrhoea: a cluster sampling study. Int J Nurs Pract. 2012; 18(2): 117–124.
  13. Ozerdogan N, Sayiner D, Ayranci U, et al. Prevalence and predictors of dysmenorrhea among students at a university in Turkey. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2009; 107(1): 39–43.
  14. Stefansson H, Geirsson RT, Steinthorsdottir V, et al. Genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing endometriosis. Hum Reprod. 2002; 17(3): 555–559.
  15. Whitehill K, Yong PJ, Williams C. Clinical predictors of endometriosis in the infertility population: is there a better way to determine who needs a laparoscopy? J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2012; 34(6): 552–557.
  16. Fjerbaek A, Knudsen UB. Endometriosis, dysmenorrhea and diet--what is the evidence? Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2007; 132(2): 140–147.
  17. Tsubura A, Uehara N, Kiyozuka Y, et al. Dietary factors modifying breast cancer risk and relation to time of intake. J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia. 2005; 10(1): 87–100.
  18. Littman AJ, Beresford SA, White E. The association of dietary fat and plant foods with endometrial cancer (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2001; 12(8): 691–702.
  19. La Rocca C, Mantovani A. From environment to food: the case of PCB. Ann Ist Super Sanita. 2006; 42(4): 410–416.
  20. Grassi P, Fattore E, Generoso C, et al. Polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in fruit and vegetables from an industrial area in northern Italy. Chemosphere. 2010; 79(3): 292–298.
  21. Parazzini F, Chiaffarino F, Surace M, et al. Selected food intake and risk of endometriosis. Hum Reprod. 2004; 19(8): 1755–1759.
  22. Trabert B, Peters U, De Roos AJ, et al. Diet and risk of endometriosis in a population-based case-control study. Br J Nutr. 2011; 105(3): 459–467.
  23. Savaris AL, do Amaral VF. Nutrient intake, anthropometric data and correlations with the systemic antioxidant capacity of women with pelvic endometriosis. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2011; 158(2): 314–318.
  24. Heilier JF, Donnez J, Nackers F, et al. Environmental and host-associated risk factors in endometriosis and deep endometriotic nodules: a matched case-control study. Environ Res. 2007; 103(1): 121–129.
  25. Khanaki K, Nouri M, Ardekani AM, et al. Evaluation of the relationship between endometriosis and omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Iran Biomed J. 2012; 16(1): 38–43.
  26. Sesti F, Capozzolo T, Pietropolli A, et al. Hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy versus placebo in the control of painful symptoms after conservative surgery for endometriosis stage III-IV. A randomized comparative trial. Fertil Steril. 2007; 88(6): 1541–1547.
  27. Sesti F, Capozzolo T, Pietropolli A, et al. Recurrence rate of endometrioma after laparoscopic cystectomy: a comparative randomized trial between post-operative hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy vs. placebo. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2009; 147(1): 72–77.
  28. Britton JA, Westhoff C, Howe GR, et al. Diet and benign ovarian tumors (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2000; 11(5): 389–401.
  29. Tsuchiya M, Miura T, Hanaoka T, et al. Effect of soy isoflavones on endometriosis: interaction with estrogen receptor 2 gene polymorphism. Epidemiology. 2007; 18(3): 402–408.
  30. Harris HR, Chavarro JE, Malspeis S, et al. Dairy-food, calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D intake and endometriosis: a prospective cohort study. Am J Epidemiol. 2013; 177(5): 420–430.
  31. Matalliotakis IM, Cakmak H, Fragouli YG, et al. Epidemiological characteristics in women with and without endometriosis in the Yale series. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2008; 277(5): 389–393.
  32. Chiaffarino F, Bravi F, Cipriani S, et al. Coffee and caffeine intake and risk of endometriosis: a meta-analysis. Eur J Nutr. 2014; 53(7): 1573–1579.
  33. Lucero J, Harlow BL, Barbieri RL, et al. Early follicular phase hormone levels in relation to patterns of alcohol, tobacco, and coffee use. Fertil Steril. 2001; 76(4): 723–729.
  34. Heard ME, Melnyk SB, Simmen FA, et al. High-Fat Diet Promotion of Endometriosis in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model is Associated With Altered Peripheral and Ectopic Lesion Redox and Inflammatory Status. Endocrinology. 2016; 157(7): 2870–2882.
  35. Herington JL, Glore DR, Lucas JA, et al. Dietary fish oil supplementation inhibits formation of endometriosis-associated adhesions in a chimeric mouse model. Fertil Steril. 2013; 99(2): 543–550.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl