open access

Vol 4, No 1 (2018)
Prace poglądowe
Published online: 2018-04-05
Get Citation

Etiologia i czynniki ryzyka rozwoju twardziny układowej — przegląd literatury

Marta Bromirska, Żaneta Smoleńska, Zbigniew Zdrojewski
Forum Reumatologiczne 2018;4(1):52-56.

open access

Vol 4, No 1 (2018)
Prace poglądowe
Published online: 2018-04-05

Abstract

Twardzina układowa (SSc) jest rzadką chorobą autoimmunologiczną charakteryzującą się włóknieniem skóry oraz różnych narządów wewnętrznych. Wśród czynników etiologicznych dopatruje się zależności genetycznych oraz środowiskowych. Choroba częściej występuje u płci żeńskiej, osób eksponowanych na substancje toksyczne (związki krzemu, rozpuszczalniki organiczne, pestycydy, leki), a także w niektórych regionach geograficznych. W pracy przybliżono możliwe zależności etiologiczne oraz czynniki ryzyka zachorowania na twardzinę układową.

Forum Reumatol. 2018, tom 4, nr 1: 52–56

Abstract

Twardzina układowa (SSc) jest rzadką chorobą autoimmunologiczną charakteryzującą się włóknieniem skóry oraz różnych narządów wewnętrznych. Wśród czynników etiologicznych dopatruje się zależności genetycznych oraz środowiskowych. Choroba częściej występuje u płci żeńskiej, osób eksponowanych na substancje toksyczne (związki krzemu, rozpuszczalniki organiczne, pestycydy, leki), a także w niektórych regionach geograficznych. W pracy przybliżono możliwe zależności etiologiczne oraz czynniki ryzyka zachorowania na twardzinę układową.

Forum Reumatol. 2018, tom 4, nr 1: 52–56

Get Citation

Keywords

twardzina układowa; etiologia; czynniki ryzyka

About this article
Title

Etiologia i czynniki ryzyka rozwoju twardziny układowej — przegląd literatury

Journal

Forum Reumatologiczne

Issue

Vol 4, No 1 (2018)

Pages

52-56

Published online

2018-04-05

Bibliographic record

Forum Reumatologiczne 2018;4(1):52-56.

Keywords

twardzina układowa
etiologia
czynniki ryzyka

Authors

Marta Bromirska
Żaneta Smoleńska
Zbigniew Zdrojewski

References (34)
  1. Abraham DJ, Varga J. Scleroderma: from cell and molecular mechanisms to disease models. Trends Immunol. 2005; 26(11): 587–595.
  2. LeRoy EC, Black C, Fleischmajer R, et al. Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis): classification, subsets and pathogenesis. J Rheumatol. 1988; 15(2): 202–205.
  3. Reimer G, Steen VD, Penning CA, et al. Correlates between autoantibodies to nucleolar antigens and clinical features in patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Arthritis Rheum. 1988; 31(4): 525–532.
  4. van den Hoogen F, Khanna D, Fransen J, et al. 2013 classification criteria for systemic sclerosis: an American college of rheumatology/European league against rheumatism collaborative initiative. Ann Rheum Dis. 2013; 72(11): 1747–1755.
  5. Chifflot H, Fautrel B, Sordet C, et al. Incidence and prevalence of systemic sclerosis: a systematic literature review. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2008; 37(4): 223–235.
  6. Kanecki K, Goryński P, Tarka P, et al. Incidence and prevalence of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) in Poland - differences between rural and urban regions. Ann Agric Environ Med. 2017; 24(2): 240–244.
  7. Silman AJ. Epidemiology of scleroderma. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. 1991; 50(Supplement 4): 846–853.
  8. Nashid M, Khanna PP, Furst DE, et al. investigators of the D-penicillamine, human recombinant relaxin and oral bovine type I collagen clinical trials. Gender and ethnicity differences in patients with diffuse systemic sclerosis--analysis from three large randomized clinical trials. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011; 50(2): 335–342.
  9. Arnett FC, Cho M, Chatterjee S, et al. Familial occurrence frequencies and relative risks for systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) in three United States cohorts. Arthritis Rheum. 2001; 44(6): 1359–1362, doi: 10.1002/1529-0131(200106)44:6<1359::AID-ART228>3.0.CO;2-S.
  10. Feghali-Bostwick C, Medsger TA, Wright TM. Analysis of systemic sclerosis in twins reveals low concordance for disease and high concordance for the presence of antinuclear antibodies. Arthritis Rheum. 2003; 48(7): 1956–1963.
  11. Altorok N, Kahaleh B. Epigenetics and systemic sclerosis. Semin Immunopathol. 2015; 37(5): 453–462.
  12. Wei J, Melichian D, Komura K, et al. Canonical Wnt signaling induces skin fibrosis and subcutaneous lipoatrophy: a novel mouse model for scleroderma? Arthritis Rheum. 2011; 63(6): 1707–1717.
  13. Pollard KM. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity. Front Immunol. 2016; 7: 97.
  14. Yamamoto T. The bleomycin-induced scleroderma model: what have we learned for scleroderma pathogenesis? Arch Dermatol Res. 2006; 297(8): 333–344.
  15. Nietert PJ, Sutherland SE, Silver RM, et al. Is occupational organic solvent exposure a risk factor for scleroderma? Arthritis Rheum. 1998; 41(6): 1111–1118, doi: 10.1002/1529-0131(199806)41:6<1111::AID-ART19>3.0.CO;2-J.
  16. Magnant J, de Monte M, Guilmot JL, et al. Relationship between occupational risk factors and severity markers of systemic sclerosis. J Rheumatol. 2005; 32(9): 1713–1718.
  17. Kettaneh A, Al Moufti O, Tiev KP, et al. Occupational exposure to solvents and gender-related risk of systemic sclerosis: a metaanalysis of case-control studies. J Rheumatol. 2007; 34(1): 97–103.
  18. Thompson AE, Pope JE. Increased prevalence of scleroderma in southwestern Ontario: a cluster analysis. J Rheumatol. 2002; 29(9): 1867–1873.
  19. Aida-Yasuoka K, Peoples C, Yasuoka H, et al. Estradiol promotes the development of a fibrotic phenotype and is increased in the serum of patients with systemic sclerosis. Arthritis Res Ther. 2013; 15(1): R10.
  20. Lambe M, Björnådal L, Neregård P, et al. Childbearing and the risk of scleroderma: a population-based study in Sweden. Am J Epidemiol. 2004; 159(2): 162–166.
  21. Cockrill T, del Junco DJ, Arnett FC, et al. Separate influences of birth order and gravidity/parity on the development of systemic sclerosis. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2010; 62(3): 418–424.
  22. Jimenez SA, Artlett CM. Microchimerism and systemic sclerosis. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2005; 17(1): 86–90.
  23. ERASMUS LD. Scleroderma in goldminers on the Witwatersrand with particular reference to pulmonary manifestations. S Afr J Lab Clin Med. 1957; 3(3): 209–231.
  24. Marie I, Gehanno JF. Environmental risk factors of systemic sclerosis. Semin Immunopathol. 2015; 37(5): 463–473.
  25. Rubio-Rivas M, Moreno R, Corbella X. Occupational and environmental scleroderma. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Clin Rheumatol. 2017; 36(3): 569–582.
  26. Janowsky EC, Kupper LL, Hulka BS. Meta-analyses of the relation between silicone breast implants and the risk of connective-tissue diseases. N Engl J Med. 2000; 342(11): 781–790.
  27. Marie I, Gehanno JF, Bubenheim M, et al. Systemic sclerosis and exposure to heavy metals: A case control study of 100 patients and 300 controls. Autoimmun Rev. 2017; 16(3): 223–230.
  28. Mora GF. Systemic sclerosis: environmental factors. J Rheumatol. 2009; 36(11): 2383–2396.
  29. Wilson R. Occupational Acroosteolysis. JAMA. 1967; 201(8): 577–581.
  30. Läuchli S, Trüeb RM, Fehr M, et al. Scleroderma-like drug reaction to paclitaxel (Taxol). Br J Dermatol. 2002; 147(3): 619–621.
  31. Aeschlimann A, de Truchis P, Kahn MF. Scleroderma after therapy with appetite suppressants. Report on four cases. Scand J Rheumatol. 1990; 19(1): 87–90.
  32. Silman AJ, Howard Y, Hicklin AJ, et al. Geographical clustering of scleroderma in south and west London. Br J Rheumatol. 1990; 29(2): 93–96.
  33. Roberts-Thomson PJ, Jones M, Hakendorf P, et al. Scleroderma in South Australia: epidemiological observations of possible pathogenic significance. Intern Med J. 2001; 31(4): 220–229.
  34. Lo Monaco A, Bruschi M, La Corte R, et al. Epidemiology of systemic sclerosis in a district of northern Italy. Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2011; 29(2 Suppl 65): S10–S14.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Wydawcą serwisu jest  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl