open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2020-11-10
Accepted: 2020-12-28
Published online: 2021-02-09
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Morphometric profile in foetuses and evolution of Achilles tendon

A. Waśniewska1, Ł. Olewnik2, M. Polguj1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0013
·
Pubmed: 33577076
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):144-149.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Normal and Clinical Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy and Histology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Chair of Anatomy and Histology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland

open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-11-10
Accepted: 2020-12-28
Published online: 2021-02-09

Abstract

Background: The Achilles tendon (AT) develops from the merge of the tendinous part of the gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SM) muscles. The AT is the structural base for the biomechanical work of the ankle joint. Understanding morphometry of the AT is crucial due to the tendon vulnerability to rupture and damage which requires further surgical repair and management. Despite its clinical significance, data concerning measurements of the AT in human foetuses are scare. The aim of our study was to assess the AT, GM and SM morphometry in human foetuses.
Materials and methods: Thirty-seven spontaneously-aborted human foetuses (17 male, 20 female) aged 18–38 weeks of gestation were examined. The morphometry of the GM, SM and AT were evaluated.
Results: No significant correlation between sex or side and size of the AT in human foetuses was observed. The only significant correlation was between sex and the length of the tendon of the SM; in 3rd trimester it was longer in male than in female. In 2nd trimester the SM muscle to tendon ratio was higher in female than in male.
Conclusions: There was no significant correlation between sex or side and size of the AT in human foetuses, probably due to scant muscle load during prenatal period.

Abstract

Background: The Achilles tendon (AT) develops from the merge of the tendinous part of the gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SM) muscles. The AT is the structural base for the biomechanical work of the ankle joint. Understanding morphometry of the AT is crucial due to the tendon vulnerability to rupture and damage which requires further surgical repair and management. Despite its clinical significance, data concerning measurements of the AT in human foetuses are scare. The aim of our study was to assess the AT, GM and SM morphometry in human foetuses.
Materials and methods: Thirty-seven spontaneously-aborted human foetuses (17 male, 20 female) aged 18–38 weeks of gestation were examined. The morphometry of the GM, SM and AT were evaluated.
Results: No significant correlation between sex or side and size of the AT in human foetuses was observed. The only significant correlation was between sex and the length of the tendon of the SM; in 3rd trimester it was longer in male than in female. In 2nd trimester the SM muscle to tendon ratio was higher in female than in male.
Conclusions: There was no significant correlation between sex or side and size of the AT in human foetuses, probably due to scant muscle load during prenatal period.

Get Citation

Keywords

foetuses, Achilles tendon, calcaneal tendon, triceps suralis

About this article
Title

Morphometric profile in foetuses and evolution of Achilles tendon

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

144-149

Published online

2021-02-09

Page views

1803

Article views/downloads

617

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0013

Pubmed

33577076

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):144-149.

Keywords

foetuses
Achilles tendon
calcaneal tendon
triceps suralis

Authors

A. Waśniewska
Ł. Olewnik
M. Polguj

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