open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2020-05-30
Accepted: 2020-08-12
Published online: 2020-09-02
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Topography of the common fibular nerve terminal division in human foetuses

A. Karykowska1, Z. A. Domagala2, B. Gworys3
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0103
·
Pubmed: 32896876
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):37-43.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anthropology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland
  2. Division of Anatomy, Department of Human Morphology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland
  3. Faculty of Health Science and Physical Education, The Witelon State University of Applied Sciences, Legnica, Poland

open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-05-30
Accepted: 2020-08-12
Published online: 2020-09-02

Abstract

Background: The progress of paediatric surgery and increasingly better diagnosis of foetal defects require detailed knowledge of human developmental anatomy. Precise knowledge of the anatomy of innervation of the lower extremities corresponds to this subject and is not only cognitive but also clinically important. The end of the common fibular nerve is superficially located in the area exposed to frequent injuries as well as in the area subject to possible surgical repair procedures.
Materials and methods: The analysis was carried out on 200 human foetuses aged from the 113th day to 222nd day of foetal life. The study material is a part of local foetal collection. The study incorporated the following methods: anthropological, preparational and image acquisition which was acquired with the use of high-resolution digital camera. Statistical analysis was carried out with the use of STATISTICA package.
Results: Based on the research results the new typology of the examined nerve was determined. The head of the fibula was the criterion: (i) high division — above the head of the fibula (1%); (ii) intermediate division — at the height of the head of the fibula (34%); (iii) low division — below the head of the fibula (65%). The mathematical analysis did not reveal statistically significant bilateral and gender differences. Moreover the additional branch was observed in 30% of foetuses, regardless of age class. This branch occurred in 50% of cases in both sides of the foetus. This nerve was defined as the accessory fibular nerve (nervous fibularis/peroneus accessorius).
Conclusions: The created unique typology of the terminal division of common fibular nerve is an important supplement to the anatomical knowledge and at the same time, due to the peripheral and superficial location of the described structures, it has a relatively high clinical significance.

Abstract

Background: The progress of paediatric surgery and increasingly better diagnosis of foetal defects require detailed knowledge of human developmental anatomy. Precise knowledge of the anatomy of innervation of the lower extremities corresponds to this subject and is not only cognitive but also clinically important. The end of the common fibular nerve is superficially located in the area exposed to frequent injuries as well as in the area subject to possible surgical repair procedures.
Materials and methods: The analysis was carried out on 200 human foetuses aged from the 113th day to 222nd day of foetal life. The study material is a part of local foetal collection. The study incorporated the following methods: anthropological, preparational and image acquisition which was acquired with the use of high-resolution digital camera. Statistical analysis was carried out with the use of STATISTICA package.
Results: Based on the research results the new typology of the examined nerve was determined. The head of the fibula was the criterion: (i) high division — above the head of the fibula (1%); (ii) intermediate division — at the height of the head of the fibula (34%); (iii) low division — below the head of the fibula (65%). The mathematical analysis did not reveal statistically significant bilateral and gender differences. Moreover the additional branch was observed in 30% of foetuses, regardless of age class. This branch occurred in 50% of cases in both sides of the foetus. This nerve was defined as the accessory fibular nerve (nervous fibularis/peroneus accessorius).
Conclusions: The created unique typology of the terminal division of common fibular nerve is an important supplement to the anatomical knowledge and at the same time, due to the peripheral and superficial location of the described structures, it has a relatively high clinical significance.

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Keywords

common peroneal nerve, dissection, human foetuses, accessory fibular nerve

About this article
Title

Topography of the common fibular nerve terminal division in human foetuses

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

37-43

Published online

2020-09-02

Page views

2048

Article views/downloads

1031

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0103

Pubmed

32896876

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):37-43.

Keywords

common peroneal nerve
dissection
human foetuses
accessory fibular nerve

Authors

A. Karykowska
Z. A. Domagala
B. Gworys

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