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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-03-19
Submitted: 2018-12-12
Accepted: 2019-01-28
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A morphological study of the medial and lateral femoral circumflex arteries: a proposal for a new classification

Piotr Łabętowicz, Łukasz Olewnik, Michał Podgórski, Marcin Majos, Ludomir Stefańczyk, Mirosław Topol, Michał Polguj
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0033
·
Pubmed: 30906974

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-03-19
Submitted: 2018-12-12
Accepted: 2019-01-28

Abstract

Background: Confirming the branching pattern of the deep femoral artery (DFA) is vital in planning radiological and surgical procedures involving the medial circumflex femoral artery (MFCA) and the lateral circumflex artery (LFCA). The aim of this study was to characterise the course and morphology of branches of the deep femoral artery.

Material and methods: The anatomical dissection included 80 lower limbs which were fixed in 10 % formalin solution. A dissection of the femoral region was carried out according to a pre-established protocol, using traditional techniques. Morphometric measurements were obtained twice by two researchers.

Results: Six types of medial and lateral femoral circumflex artery variations were distinguished. In Type I, the DFA divides into the MFCA and the LFCA (observed in 45% of cases). In Type II, the MFCA is absent and the LFCA origin normally from the DFA (18.75 %). In Type III, the MFCA arises from the FA above the origin of the DFA, while the LFCA starts from the DFA (15%). Finally, in Type IV, the LFCA arises from the femoral artery above the origin of the DFA, while the MFCA starts from the DFA (10%). In Type V, the LFCA origin alone from the femoral artery below the origin of the DFA, while the MFCA origin from the DFA (7.5%), while in Type VI (3.75%), both the MFCA and the LFCA origin from the FA. The mean diameter of the femoral artery at the level of the deep femoral artery origin was greatest in Type 2 (10.62±2.07mm) and the least in Type 6 (7.90±1.72mm)(p =0.0317). The distance from inguinal ligament to where the DFA arose was the greatest in Type 6 (78.24±29.74 mm) and least in Type 5 (28.85±11.72 mm) (p=0.0529).

Conclusions: The medial and lateral femoral circumflex arteries were characterized by high morphological variations. The diameter of the femoral artery at the level of inguinal ligament correlated with the diameter of the DFA and distance to where the DFA arises from femoral artery.

Abstract

Background: Confirming the branching pattern of the deep femoral artery (DFA) is vital in planning radiological and surgical procedures involving the medial circumflex femoral artery (MFCA) and the lateral circumflex artery (LFCA). The aim of this study was to characterise the course and morphology of branches of the deep femoral artery.

Material and methods: The anatomical dissection included 80 lower limbs which were fixed in 10 % formalin solution. A dissection of the femoral region was carried out according to a pre-established protocol, using traditional techniques. Morphometric measurements were obtained twice by two researchers.

Results: Six types of medial and lateral femoral circumflex artery variations were distinguished. In Type I, the DFA divides into the MFCA and the LFCA (observed in 45% of cases). In Type II, the MFCA is absent and the LFCA origin normally from the DFA (18.75 %). In Type III, the MFCA arises from the FA above the origin of the DFA, while the LFCA starts from the DFA (15%). Finally, in Type IV, the LFCA arises from the femoral artery above the origin of the DFA, while the MFCA starts from the DFA (10%). In Type V, the LFCA origin alone from the femoral artery below the origin of the DFA, while the MFCA origin from the DFA (7.5%), while in Type VI (3.75%), both the MFCA and the LFCA origin from the FA. The mean diameter of the femoral artery at the level of the deep femoral artery origin was greatest in Type 2 (10.62±2.07mm) and the least in Type 6 (7.90±1.72mm)(p =0.0317). The distance from inguinal ligament to where the DFA arose was the greatest in Type 6 (78.24±29.74 mm) and least in Type 5 (28.85±11.72 mm) (p=0.0529).

Conclusions: The medial and lateral femoral circumflex arteries were characterized by high morphological variations. The diameter of the femoral artery at the level of inguinal ligament correlated with the diameter of the DFA and distance to where the DFA arises from femoral artery.

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Keywords

anatomy, classification, deep femoral artery, lateral circumflex femoral artery, medial circumflex femoral artery, variations

About this article
Title

A morphological study of the medial and lateral femoral circumflex arteries: a proposal for a new classification

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-03-19

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0033

Pubmed

30906974

Keywords

anatomy
classification
deep femoral artery
lateral circumflex femoral artery
medial circumflex femoral artery
variations

Authors

Piotr Łabętowicz
Łukasz Olewnik
Michał Podgórski
Marcin Majos
Ludomir Stefańczyk
Mirosław Topol
Michał Polguj

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