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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-07
Submitted: 2018-11-21
Accepted: 2019-01-03
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Detection of root canals in historical population from Radom (Poland)

Agata Przesmycka, Jacek Tomczyk, Anna Pogorzelska, Piotr Regulski, Kazimierz Szopiński
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0014
·
Pubmed: 30761513

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-07
Submitted: 2018-11-21
Accepted: 2019-01-03

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyze the number of root canals in maxillary first premolars, first molars and mandibular first molars teeth from an 18th – 19th century Radom (Poland) population, and then assess whether the diversity of root canals has fluctuated for about two hundred years. A total of 139 human permanent teeth were analyzed by Cone Beam Computed Tomography in three projections. The types of root canal systems were classified in each tooth root separately. In one-rooted maxillary premolars, two canals occurred most often (53%). In two-rooted majority buccal (91%) and every palatal roots there is one canal. All three-rooted maxillary premolars have one root canal. In two-rooted first maxillary molars, fused roots have two canals. All mesiobuccal roots presented type 2-1 canal configurations. In three-rooted maxillary first molars in the mesiobuccal roots the most common root canal type is 2-1 (72%). A second mesiobuccal canal (MB2) occurred in 86%. The distobuccal and palatal roots presented one canal in all cases. First mandibular molars occurred in two-rooted form in 98%. In mesial roots, two root canals predominate (59%). The distal root has one canal in 66%. In three-rooted teeth have dominated one root canal. Knowledge about the variation in root canals is important in studies of past populations. This evidence may be important in relation to assessing the variability of human populations. The analysis carried out show the cohesion between the historical population from Radom with other groups from modern Poland.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyze the number of root canals in maxillary first premolars, first molars and mandibular first molars teeth from an 18th – 19th century Radom (Poland) population, and then assess whether the diversity of root canals has fluctuated for about two hundred years. A total of 139 human permanent teeth were analyzed by Cone Beam Computed Tomography in three projections. The types of root canal systems were classified in each tooth root separately. In one-rooted maxillary premolars, two canals occurred most often (53%). In two-rooted majority buccal (91%) and every palatal roots there is one canal. All three-rooted maxillary premolars have one root canal. In two-rooted first maxillary molars, fused roots have two canals. All mesiobuccal roots presented type 2-1 canal configurations. In three-rooted maxillary first molars in the mesiobuccal roots the most common root canal type is 2-1 (72%). A second mesiobuccal canal (MB2) occurred in 86%. The distobuccal and palatal roots presented one canal in all cases. First mandibular molars occurred in two-rooted form in 98%. In mesial roots, two root canals predominate (59%). The distal root has one canal in 66%. In three-rooted teeth have dominated one root canal. Knowledge about the variation in root canals is important in studies of past populations. This evidence may be important in relation to assessing the variability of human populations. The analysis carried out show the cohesion between the historical population from Radom with other groups from modern Poland.

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Keywords

root canal systems, historical teeth, cone beam computed tomography, Radom

About this article
Title

Detection of root canals in historical population from Radom (Poland)

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-02-07

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0014

Pubmed

30761513

Keywords

root canal systems
historical teeth
cone beam computed tomography
Radom

Authors

Agata Przesmycka
Jacek Tomczyk
Anna Pogorzelska
Piotr Regulski
Kazimierz Szopiński

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