open access

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-11-14
Submitted: 2018-07-16
Accepted: 2018-11-12
Get Citation

A classical model of educational cooperation in Human Anatomy: the Table Leaders

A. R. W. Pinto-Souza, G. Pérez-Arana, C. Firetto-Saladino, C. Carrasco-Molinillo, A. Ribelles-Garcia, J. A. Prada-Oliveira
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0107
·
Pubmed: 30484272
·
Folia Morphol 2019;78(3):626-629.

open access

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-11-14
Submitted: 2018-07-16
Accepted: 2018-11-12

Abstract

This project has been developed for many years in the Human Anatomy courses. Its good outcomes have been confirmed by years of evidence of excellent results obtained through the learning of Human Anatomy. This method of teaching and learning as one allows students who are taking Human Anatomy classes to receive practical training in small groups and transmit it to their colleagues in the practical training established in the Medical degree. Table Leaders feel rewarded as they learn to speak in public, regularly transmitting the knowledge obtained, and by having to be up to date with their studies. These are all aspects that help, not only the Table Leaders process of learning, but also that of their colleagues, who see closely and carefully anatomical details that help them understand the subject. This method of supporting practical training is always under the supervision of the teacher who develops the practical classes. These Leaders used to pass the test without additional problems. Thus the note was significantly increased versus the class colleagues.  

Abstract

This project has been developed for many years in the Human Anatomy courses. Its good outcomes have been confirmed by years of evidence of excellent results obtained through the learning of Human Anatomy. This method of teaching and learning as one allows students who are taking Human Anatomy classes to receive practical training in small groups and transmit it to their colleagues in the practical training established in the Medical degree. Table Leaders feel rewarded as they learn to speak in public, regularly transmitting the knowledge obtained, and by having to be up to date with their studies. These are all aspects that help, not only the Table Leaders process of learning, but also that of their colleagues, who see closely and carefully anatomical details that help them understand the subject. This method of supporting practical training is always under the supervision of the teacher who develops the practical classes. These Leaders used to pass the test without additional problems. Thus the note was significantly increased versus the class colleagues.  

Get Citation

Keywords

medical education; anatomy learning; peer-teaching; human anatomy

About this article
Title

A classical model of educational cooperation in Human Anatomy: the Table Leaders

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)

Pages

626-629

Published online

2018-11-14

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0107

Pubmed

30484272

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2019;78(3):626-629.

Keywords

medical education
anatomy learning
peer-teaching
human anatomy

Authors

A. R. W. Pinto-Souza
G. Pérez-Arana
C. Firetto-Saladino
C. Carrasco-Molinillo
A. Ribelles-Garcia
J. A. Prada-Oliveira

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