open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
Original article
Submitted: 2023-02-06
Accepted: 2023-03-26
Published online: 2023-04-20
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The inferior gluteal artery anatomy: a detailed analysis with implications for plastic and reconstructive surgery

Kamil Gabryszuk1, Michał Bonczar23, Patryk Ostrowski23, Jakub Gliwa23, Alicia del Carmen Yika2, Tomasz Iskra2, Michał Kłosiński2, Wadim Wojciechowski4, Jerzy Walocha23, Mateusz Koziej23
·
Pubmed: 37144850
·
Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):53-65.
Affiliations
  1. Chiroplastica — The Lower Silesian Centre of Hand Surgery and Aesthetic Medicine, Wroclaw, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland
  3. Youthoria, Youth Research Organization, Krakow, Poland
  4. Department of Radiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland

open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2023-02-06
Accepted: 2023-03-26
Published online: 2023-04-20

Abstract

Background: The inferior gluteal artery (IGA) is a large terminal branch of the anterior division of the internal iliac artery (ADIIA). There is a significant lack of data regarding the variable anatomy of the IGA.

Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted to establish anatomical variations, their prevalence and morphometrical data on IGA and its branches. The results of 75 consecutive patients who underwent pelvic computed
tomography angiography were analysed.

Results: The origin variation of each IGA was deeply analysed. Four origin variations have been observed. The most common type O1 occurred in 86 of the studied cases (62.3%). The median IGA length was set to be 68.50 mm (lower quartile [LQ]: 54.29; higher quartile [HQ]: 86.06). The median distance from the origin of the ADIIA to the origin of the IGA was set to be 38.22 mm (LQ: 20.22; HQ: 55.97). The median origin diameter of the IGA was established at 4.69 mm
(LQ: 4.13; HQ: 5.45).

Conclusions: The present study thoroughly analysed the complete anatomy of the IGA and the branches of the ADIIA. A novel classification system for the origin of the IGA was created, where the most prevalent origin was from the ADIIA (type 1; 62.3%). Furthermore, the morphometric properties (such as the diameter and length) of the branches of the ADIIA were analysed. This data may be incredibly useful for physicians performing operations in the pelvis, such as interventional intraarterial procedures or various gynaecological surgeries.

Abstract

Background: The inferior gluteal artery (IGA) is a large terminal branch of the anterior division of the internal iliac artery (ADIIA). There is a significant lack of data regarding the variable anatomy of the IGA.

Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted to establish anatomical variations, their prevalence and morphometrical data on IGA and its branches. The results of 75 consecutive patients who underwent pelvic computed
tomography angiography were analysed.

Results: The origin variation of each IGA was deeply analysed. Four origin variations have been observed. The most common type O1 occurred in 86 of the studied cases (62.3%). The median IGA length was set to be 68.50 mm (lower quartile [LQ]: 54.29; higher quartile [HQ]: 86.06). The median distance from the origin of the ADIIA to the origin of the IGA was set to be 38.22 mm (LQ: 20.22; HQ: 55.97). The median origin diameter of the IGA was established at 4.69 mm
(LQ: 4.13; HQ: 5.45).

Conclusions: The present study thoroughly analysed the complete anatomy of the IGA and the branches of the ADIIA. A novel classification system for the origin of the IGA was created, where the most prevalent origin was from the ADIIA (type 1; 62.3%). Furthermore, the morphometric properties (such as the diameter and length) of the branches of the ADIIA were analysed. This data may be incredibly useful for physicians performing operations in the pelvis, such as interventional intraarterial procedures or various gynaecological surgeries.

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Keywords

inferior gluteal artery, plastic surgery, uterine artery, anatomy, surgery

About this article
Title

The inferior gluteal artery anatomy: a detailed analysis with implications for plastic and reconstructive surgery

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica

Article type

Original article

Pages

53-65

Published online

2023-04-20

Page views

463

Article views/downloads

423

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2023.0029

Pubmed

37144850

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):53-65.

Keywords

inferior gluteal artery
plastic surgery
uterine artery
anatomy
surgery

Authors

Kamil Gabryszuk
Michał Bonczar
Patryk Ostrowski
Jakub Gliwa
Alicia del Carmen Yika
Tomasz Iskra
Michał Kłosiński
Wadim Wojciechowski
Jerzy Walocha
Mateusz Koziej

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