open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
Original article
Submitted: 2022-12-16
Accepted: 2023-01-23
Published online: 2023-01-26
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Evaluation of congenital rib anomalies with multi-detector computed tomography in the Turkish population

Zulal Oner1, Serkan Oner2, Necati Emre Sahin3, Mahmut Cay4
·
Pubmed: 36794687
·
Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):182-191.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, İzmir Bakırçay University, İzmir, Turkey
  2. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, İzmir Bakırçay University, İzmir, Turkey
  3. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Karabük University, Karabük, Turkey
  4. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Uşak University, Uşak, Turkey

open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-12-16
Accepted: 2023-01-23
Published online: 2023-01-26

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to evaluate the congenital anomalies of ribs in the Turkish population using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) and to reveal the prevalence and distribution of these anomalies according to sexes and body sides. Materials and methods: This study included 1120 individuals (592 male, 528 female) over 18 who presented to our hospital with a suspicion of COVID-19 and who had thoracic CT. Anomalies such as a bifid rib, cervical rib, fused rib, Srb anomaly, foramen rib, hypoplastic rib, absent rib, supernumerary rib, pectus carinatum, and pectus excavatum, which were previously defined in the literature, were examined. Descriptive statistics were performed with the distribution of anomalies. Comparisons were made between the sexes and body sides. Results: A prevalence of 18.57% rib variation was observed. Females had 1.3 times more variation than males. Although there was a significant difference in the distribution of anomalies by sex (p = 0.000), there was no difference in terms of body side of anomaly (p > 0.05). The most common anomaly was the hypoplastic rib, followed by the absence of a rib. While the incidence of the hypoplastic rib was similar in females and males, 79.07% of the absent ribs was seen in females (p < 0.05). The study also includes a rare case of bilateral first rib foramen. At the same time, this study includes a rare case of rib spurs extending from the left 11th rib to the 11th intercostal space. Conclusions: This study demonstrates detailed information about congenital rib anomalies in the Turkish population, which may vary between people. Knowing these anomalies is essential for anatomy, radiology, anthropology, and forensic sciences.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to evaluate the congenital anomalies of ribs in the Turkish population using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) and to reveal the prevalence and distribution of these anomalies according to sexes and body sides. Materials and methods: This study included 1120 individuals (592 male, 528 female) over 18 who presented to our hospital with a suspicion of COVID-19 and who had thoracic CT. Anomalies such as a bifid rib, cervical rib, fused rib, Srb anomaly, foramen rib, hypoplastic rib, absent rib, supernumerary rib, pectus carinatum, and pectus excavatum, which were previously defined in the literature, were examined. Descriptive statistics were performed with the distribution of anomalies. Comparisons were made between the sexes and body sides. Results: A prevalence of 18.57% rib variation was observed. Females had 1.3 times more variation than males. Although there was a significant difference in the distribution of anomalies by sex (p = 0.000), there was no difference in terms of body side of anomaly (p > 0.05). The most common anomaly was the hypoplastic rib, followed by the absence of a rib. While the incidence of the hypoplastic rib was similar in females and males, 79.07% of the absent ribs was seen in females (p < 0.05). The study also includes a rare case of bilateral first rib foramen. At the same time, this study includes a rare case of rib spurs extending from the left 11th rib to the 11th intercostal space. Conclusions: This study demonstrates detailed information about congenital rib anomalies in the Turkish population, which may vary between people. Knowing these anomalies is essential for anatomy, radiology, anthropology, and forensic sciences.

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Keywords

rib, rib anomalies, thorax, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT)

About this article
Title

Evaluation of congenital rib anomalies with multi-detector computed tomography in the Turkish population

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica

Article type

Original article

Pages

182-191

Published online

2023-01-26

Page views

520

Article views/downloads

586

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2023.0006

Pubmed

36794687

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):182-191.

Keywords

rib
rib anomalies
thorax
multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT)

Authors

Zulal Oner
Serkan Oner
Necati Emre Sahin
Mahmut Cay

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