open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
Case report
Submitted: 2022-11-13
Accepted: 2022-12-15
Published online: 2023-02-16
Get Citation

A very rare case report: accessory head of the sartorius muscle

Nicol Zielinska1, Richard Shane Tubbs234567, Adrian Balcerzak1, Łukasz Olewnik1
·
Pubmed: 36811136
·
Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):244-249.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies
  3. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  4. Department of Neurology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  5. Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  6. Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  7. Department of Neurosurgery, Ochsner Medical Centre, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2022-11-13
Accepted: 2022-12-15
Published online: 2023-02-16

Abstract

The sartorius muscle belongs to the anterior compartment of the thigh. Morphological variations of this muscle are very rare, few cases being described in the literature. An 88-year-old female cadaver was dissected routinely for research and teaching purposes. However, an interesting variation was found during anatomical dissection. The proximal part of the sartorius muscle had the normal course, but the distal part bifurcated into two muscle bellies. The additional head passed medially
to the standard head; thereafter, there was a muscular connection between them. This connection then passed into the tendinous distal attachment. It created a pes anserinus superficialis, which was located superficially to the distal attachments of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. This superficial layer was very wide and attached to the medial part of the tibial tuberosity and to the crural fascia. Importantly, two cutaneous branches of the saphenous nerve passed between the two heads. The two heads were innervated by separate muscular branches of the femoral nerve. Such morphological variability could be clinically important.

Abstract

The sartorius muscle belongs to the anterior compartment of the thigh. Morphological variations of this muscle are very rare, few cases being described in the literature. An 88-year-old female cadaver was dissected routinely for research and teaching purposes. However, an interesting variation was found during anatomical dissection. The proximal part of the sartorius muscle had the normal course, but the distal part bifurcated into two muscle bellies. The additional head passed medially
to the standard head; thereafter, there was a muscular connection between them. This connection then passed into the tendinous distal attachment. It created a pes anserinus superficialis, which was located superficially to the distal attachments of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. This superficial layer was very wide and attached to the medial part of the tibial tuberosity and to the crural fascia. Importantly, two cutaneous branches of the saphenous nerve passed between the two heads. The two heads were innervated by separate muscular branches of the femoral nerve. Such morphological variability could be clinically important.

Get Citation

Keywords

sartorius muscle, accessory head, morphological variation, case report, saphenous nerve entrapment syndrome, compression

About this article
Title

A very rare case report: accessory head of the sartorius muscle

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica

Article type

Case report

Pages

244-249

Published online

2023-02-16

Page views

447

Article views/downloads

352

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2023.0014

Pubmed

36811136

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):244-249.

Keywords

sartorius muscle
accessory head
morphological variation
case report
saphenous nerve entrapment syndrome
compression

Authors

Nicol Zielinska
Richard Shane Tubbs
Adrian Balcerzak
Łukasz Olewnik

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