open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
Original article
Submitted: 2022-10-19
Accepted: 2022-12-06
Published online: 2023-03-02
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Three-dimensional volumetric analyses of temporal bone pneumatization from early childhood to early adulthood in a South African population

Okikioluwa Stephen Aladeyelu1, Samuel Oluwaseun Olojede1, Sodiq Kolawole Lawal1, Matome Nadab Matshipi1, Andile Lindokuhle Sibiya23, Carmen Olivia Rennie1, Wonder-Boy Eumane Mbatha45
·
Pubmed: 36896646
·
Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):146-156.
Affiliations
  1. Discipline of Clinical Anatomy, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine Campus, University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa
  2. Discipline of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, School of Clinical Medicine, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine Campus, University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa
  3. ENT Department, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Durban, South Africa
  4. Radiology Department, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Durban, South Africa
  5. Lake, Smit and Partners Inc., Durban, South Africa

open access

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-10-19
Accepted: 2022-12-06
Published online: 2023-03-02

Abstract

Background: A debate exists on whether the size of temporal bone pneumatization is a cause or consequence of otitis media (a global disease burden). However, a normal middle-ear mucosa is a prerequisite for normal temporal bone pneumatization. This study investigated the size of temporal bone pneumatization with age and the normal distribution of air cell volume in different stages of human growth postnatally.

Materials and methods: A three-dimensional computer-based volumetric-rendering technique was performed bilaterally on 248 head/brain and internal acoustic meatus computed tomography images of slice thickness ≤ 0.6 mm consisting of
133 males and 115 females with age range 0–35 years.

Results: The average volume of infant (0–2 years) pneumatization was 1920 mm3 with an expected rapid increase to about 4510 mm3 in childhood (6–9 years). The result also showed a significant increase (p < 0.001) in the volume of air cells up to the young adult stage I (19–25 years), followed by a significant decline in young adult stage II (26–35 years). However, the females were observed to experience an earlier increase than males. Also, population differences were observed as the Black South African population group showed a higher increase in volume with age than the White and Indian South African population groups, though the volumes of the latter increased up to young adult stage II.

Conclusions: This study concludes that the pneumatization of a healthy temporal bone is expected to continue a linear increase up until at least adult stage I. Termination of temporal bone pneumatization in an individual before this stage could signify pathologic involvement of the middle ear during childhood.

Abstract

Background: A debate exists on whether the size of temporal bone pneumatization is a cause or consequence of otitis media (a global disease burden). However, a normal middle-ear mucosa is a prerequisite for normal temporal bone pneumatization. This study investigated the size of temporal bone pneumatization with age and the normal distribution of air cell volume in different stages of human growth postnatally.

Materials and methods: A three-dimensional computer-based volumetric-rendering technique was performed bilaterally on 248 head/brain and internal acoustic meatus computed tomography images of slice thickness ≤ 0.6 mm consisting of
133 males and 115 females with age range 0–35 years.

Results: The average volume of infant (0–2 years) pneumatization was 1920 mm3 with an expected rapid increase to about 4510 mm3 in childhood (6–9 years). The result also showed a significant increase (p < 0.001) in the volume of air cells up to the young adult stage I (19–25 years), followed by a significant decline in young adult stage II (26–35 years). However, the females were observed to experience an earlier increase than males. Also, population differences were observed as the Black South African population group showed a higher increase in volume with age than the White and Indian South African population groups, though the volumes of the latter increased up to young adult stage II.

Conclusions: This study concludes that the pneumatization of a healthy temporal bone is expected to continue a linear increase up until at least adult stage I. Termination of temporal bone pneumatization in an individual before this stage could signify pathologic involvement of the middle ear during childhood.

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Keywords

pneumatization, temporal bone, air cells, three-dimensional

About this article
Title

Three-dimensional volumetric analyses of temporal bone pneumatization from early childhood to early adulthood in a South African population

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 83, No 1 (2024): Folia Morphologica

Article type

Original article

Pages

146-156

Published online

2023-03-02

Page views

669

Article views/downloads

351

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2023.0016

Pubmed

36896646

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2024;83(1):146-156.

Keywords

pneumatization
temporal bone
air cells
three-dimensional

Authors

Okikioluwa Stephen Aladeyelu
Samuel Oluwaseun Olojede
Sodiq Kolawole Lawal
Matome Nadab Matshipi
Andile Lindokuhle Sibiya
Carmen Olivia Rennie
Wonder-Boy Eumane Mbatha

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