open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2022-10-01
Accepted: 2022-11-06
Published online: 2022-12-22
Get Citation

A fully capable pianist with a congenital bilateral agenesis of extensor pollicis brevis muscle

K. P. Dąbrowski1, P. Palczewski2, H. Stankiewicz-Jóźwicka3, A. Kowalczyk1, J. Wróblewski3, B. Ciszek14
·
Pubmed: 36573365
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):963-968.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Descriptive and Clinical Anatomy, Centre for Biostructure Research, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  2. First Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  3. Department of Instrumental Studies, The Fryderyk Chopin University of Music, Warsaw, Poland
  4. Department of Neurosurgery in Bogdanowicz Children’s Hospital, Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2022-10-01
Accepted: 2022-11-06
Published online: 2022-12-22

Abstract

A 28-year-old male musical student has been presented with visible inability of
active abduction and extension of the thumbs in both hands beyond the neutral
position. The student has not been previously diagnosed and claimed no history of
trauma or surgical procedures in the area of hands and no family history of such
disabilities. The student remained capable of playing on keyboard instruments on
high level due to compensation by hyperextension of the interphalangeal joint of
both thumbs and showed no increased frequency of the injuries or playing-related
disorders. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging showed complete
bilateral agenesis of extensor pollicis brevis muscles and was classified as isolated
congenital clasped thumb syndrome. Due to the age of the student and the
agenesis of the muscles the conservative treatment was deemed inadequate and
due to high functionality of the student as a musician and unforeseeable results it
might have on a musician’s career, surgical treatment has been disadvised.

Abstract

A 28-year-old male musical student has been presented with visible inability of
active abduction and extension of the thumbs in both hands beyond the neutral
position. The student has not been previously diagnosed and claimed no history of
trauma or surgical procedures in the area of hands and no family history of such
disabilities. The student remained capable of playing on keyboard instruments on
high level due to compensation by hyperextension of the interphalangeal joint of
both thumbs and showed no increased frequency of the injuries or playing-related
disorders. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging showed complete
bilateral agenesis of extensor pollicis brevis muscles and was classified as isolated
congenital clasped thumb syndrome. Due to the age of the student and the
agenesis of the muscles the conservative treatment was deemed inadequate and
due to high functionality of the student as a musician and unforeseeable results it
might have on a musician’s career, surgical treatment has been disadvised.

Get Citation

Keywords

extensor pollicis brevis, hand, musician, agenesis, clasped thumb

About this article
Title

A fully capable pianist with a congenital bilateral agenesis of extensor pollicis brevis muscle

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

963-968

Published online

2022-12-22

Page views

707

Article views/downloads

474

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0107

Pubmed

36573365

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):963-968.

Keywords

extensor pollicis brevis
hand
musician
agenesis
clasped thumb

Authors

K. P. Dąbrowski
P. Palczewski
H. Stankiewicz-Jóźwicka
A. Kowalczyk
J. Wróblewski
B. Ciszek

References (14)
  1. Al Smail MH, Aloulou M, Zrek A. A rare case of neglected clasped thumb of 5-year-old girl treated with simple z-plasty, two tendons transplantation, and followed up for 17 years. J Surg Case Rep. 2020; 2020(2): rjz398.
  2. Ghani HA, El-Naggar A, Hegazy M, et al. Characteristics of patients with congenital clasped thumb: a prospective study of 40 patients with the results of treatment. J Child Orthop. 2007; 1(5): 313–322.
  3. Henry M. Extensor pollicis brevis spiral tenodesis for combined metacarpophalangeal instability and trapeziometacarpal arthritis. Hand (N Y). 2018; 13(2): 190–193.
  4. Hong J, Kim DK, Kang S, et al. Anomalous course of the extensor pollicis longus with multiple absences of thumb muscles. Ann Rehabil Med. 2013; 37(1): 151.
  5. Jabir S, Lyall H, Iwuagwu F. The extensor pollicis brevis: a review of its anatomy and variations. Eplasty. 2013; 13(e35): 267–277.
  6. Ogeng’o J. Clinical significance of anatomical variations. Anat J Africa. 2013; 2(1): 57–60.
  7. Rousset P, Vuillemin-Bodaghi V, Laredo JD, et al. Anatomic Variations in the First Extensor Compartment of the Wrist: Accuracy of US. Radiology. 2010; 257(2): 427–433.
  8. Serbest S, Tosun H, Tiftikci U, et al. Congenital clasped thumb that is forgetten a syndrome in clinical practice. Medicine. 2015; 94(38): e1630.
  9. Soubhagya Nayak R, Hussein M, Krishnamurthy A, et al. Variation and clinical significance of extensor pollicis brevis: a study in south indian cadavers. Chang Gung Med J. 2009; 32(6): 600–604.
  10. Strauch RJ, Strauch CB. Extensor pollicis brevis tendon can hyperextend thumb interphalangeal joint in absence of extensor pollicis longus: Case report and review of the literature. World J Orthop. 2016; 7(7): 448–451.
  11. Subasioglu Uzak A, Fryns JP, Dundar M. Syndromes Presenting adducted thumb with/without clubfoot and Dundar syndrome. Genetic Counseling. 2014; 25(2): 159–168.
  12. Taee N, Tarhani F, Goodarzi MF, et al. Mermaid syndrome: a case report of a rare congenital anomaly in full-term neonate with thumb deformity. AJP Rep. 2018; 8(4): e328–e331.
  13. Tsuyuguchi Y, Masada K, Kawabata H, et al. Congenital clasped thumb: A review of forty-three cases. J Hand Surg. 1985; 10(5): 613–618.
  14. Weckesser EC, Reed JR, Heiple KG, et al. Congenital clasped thumb (congenital flexion-adduction deformity of the thumb). J Bone Joint Surg. 1968; 50: 1417–1428.

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