open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2022-07-10
Accepted: 2022-07-27
Published online: 2022-10-28
Get Citation

Five-headed superior omohyoid

K. Maślanka1, N. Zielinska1, R. S. Tubbs234567, B. Gonera1, K. Ruzik1, Ł. Olewnik1
·
Pubmed: 36385428
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):975-979.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies
  3. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  4. Department of Neurology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  5. Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  6. Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  7. Department of Neurosurgery, Ochsner Medical Centre, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2022-07-10
Accepted: 2022-07-27
Published online: 2022-10-28

Abstract

The omohyoid is an infrahyoid muscle with two bellies. It is responsible for
lowering and positioning of the hyoid bone. It is morphologically variable in
the origin, insertion and morphology of its bellies. Quantitative variations of the
superior belly of the omohyoid muscle are not common. We present a case of
a five-headed superior omohyoid, and a short clinical review related to this muscle.
All the bellies had their origin in an intermediate tendon and were attached to the
hyoid bone. The volume of its superior part was greater than usual. Knowledge
of the anatomy of this muscle is important, especially for surgeons operating in
the anterolateral neck region.

Abstract

The omohyoid is an infrahyoid muscle with two bellies. It is responsible for
lowering and positioning of the hyoid bone. It is morphologically variable in
the origin, insertion and morphology of its bellies. Quantitative variations of the
superior belly of the omohyoid muscle are not common. We present a case of
a five-headed superior omohyoid, and a short clinical review related to this muscle.
All the bellies had their origin in an intermediate tendon and were attached to the
hyoid bone. The volume of its superior part was greater than usual. Knowledge
of the anatomy of this muscle is important, especially for surgeons operating in
the anterolateral neck region.

Get Citation

Keywords

omohyoid muscle, compression, additional head, clinical implications, myofascial pain syndrome, plastic surgery, reconstructive surgery

About this article
Title

Five-headed superior omohyoid

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

975-979

Published online

2022-10-28

Page views

853

Article views/downloads

641

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0091

Pubmed

36385428

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):975-979.

Keywords

omohyoid muscle
compression
additional head
clinical implications
myofascial pain syndrome
plastic surgery
reconstructive surgery

Authors

K. Maślanka
N. Zielinska
R. S. Tubbs
B. Gonera
K. Ruzik
Ł. Olewnik

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