open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2022-07-10
Accepted: 2022-08-21
Published online: 2022-12-23
Get Citation

Branching pattern of the internal iliac artery accompanied by a venous anastomosis: rare vascular variations

M. Kula1, Ł. Olewnik1, K. Ruzik1, R. S. Tubbs234567, A. Balcerzak1, N. Zielinska1
·
Pubmed: 36573361
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):943-947.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies
  3. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  4. Department of Neurology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  5. Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  6. Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  7. Department of Neurosurgery, Ochsner Medical Centre, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2022-07-10
Accepted: 2022-08-21
Published online: 2022-12-23

Abstract

The ability to navigate the complex and often deceptive branching patterns of the internal iliac artery can be decisive in planning and performing surgeries within the lesser pelvis. The following case report presents a peculiar quadruple division of the internal iliac artery, accompanied by a venous anastomotic structure. Apart from the posterior and anterior trunks, the superior vesicle and iliolumbar arteries arose independently from the internal iliac artery. The division was surrounded by a venous oval, compressing certain branches and potentially complicating surgical access. Due to the uncommon course of the internal iliac artery and the presence of the anastomosis, a possible nerve root compression has been identified. Both clinical significance and classification method of the case are discussed. Knowledge of this anatomical variation is valuable for both diagnosis and surgery, especially within the specialties of urology, gynaecology and general surgery.

Abstract

The ability to navigate the complex and often deceptive branching patterns of the internal iliac artery can be decisive in planning and performing surgeries within the lesser pelvis. The following case report presents a peculiar quadruple division of the internal iliac artery, accompanied by a venous anastomotic structure. Apart from the posterior and anterior trunks, the superior vesicle and iliolumbar arteries arose independently from the internal iliac artery. The division was surrounded by a venous oval, compressing certain branches and potentially complicating surgical access. Due to the uncommon course of the internal iliac artery and the presence of the anastomosis, a possible nerve root compression has been identified. Both clinical significance and classification method of the case are discussed. Knowledge of this anatomical variation is valuable for both diagnosis and surgery, especially within the specialties of urology, gynaecology and general surgery.

Get Citation

Keywords

anatomical variations, internal iliac artery, case report

About this article
Title

Branching pattern of the internal iliac artery accompanied by a venous anastomosis: rare vascular variations

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

943-947

Published online

2022-12-23

Page views

756

Article views/downloads

548

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0111

Pubmed

36573361

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):943-947.

Keywords

anatomical variations
internal iliac artery
case report

Authors

M. Kula
Ł. Olewnik
K. Ruzik
R. S. Tubbs
A. Balcerzak
N. Zielinska

References (20)
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