open access

Vol 81, No 4 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2022-04-03
Accepted: 2022-05-30
Published online: 2022-06-10
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The distribution of SIgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells in the large intestine of Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus)

X. Wang1, Y. Zhaxi1, P. Li1, W. Wang1
·
Pubmed: 35692116
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(4):963-970.
Affiliations
  1. College of Veterinary Medicine, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou, Gansu, China

open access

Vol 81, No 4 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-04-03
Accepted: 2022-05-30
Published online: 2022-06-10

Abstract

Background: Mucosal immunoglobulin comprises mainly secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) which mainly participates in the intestinal mucosal pathogenspecific immune response. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is another common immunoglobulin. Bactrian camels’ gastrointestinal mucosal tissue has a special mucosal immune system. However, the distribution characteristics of these two antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in Bactrian camel’s large intestine mucosal immunity system remain largely unknown. This study was aimed to describe the distribution characteristics and density of SIgA and IgG ASCs in the mucosal immunity tissues of Bactrian camel large intestine.
Materials and methods: Tissue samples were collected from different parts of the large intestines of 10 healthy adult Chinese Alashan Bactrian camels. Immunohistochemistry technology was used to determine the distribution of SIgA and IgG ASCs in the large intestine samples and the image-Pro Plus 6.0 was employed to calculate their densities.
Results: SIgA and IgG ASCs were distributed in lamina propria of the large intestine mucosa with some ASCs aggregating around the intestinal glands. The SIgA density increased from ileocecal orifice to the caecum and decreased from the colon to the rectum. The largest number of SIgA ASCs was observed in the caecum, followed by anterior colonic segments, ileocecal orifice, posterior colonic segments, and rectum, and the number of SIgA ASCs in the caecum was significantly larger than that in other four positions (p < 0.05). Similarly, the number of IgG ASCs was also the largest in the caecum, which was significantly higher than that in ileocecal orifice, anterior, posterior colonic segments, and rectum (p < 0.05).
Conclusions: Our findings suggest that SIgA and IgG ASCs are mainly distributed in intestinal mucosal immunity effector sites. These distribution characteristics provide evidence to support that SIgA and IgG supply effective protection and maintain homeostasis in the large intestinal mucosa.

Abstract

Background: Mucosal immunoglobulin comprises mainly secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) which mainly participates in the intestinal mucosal pathogenspecific immune response. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is another common immunoglobulin. Bactrian camels’ gastrointestinal mucosal tissue has a special mucosal immune system. However, the distribution characteristics of these two antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in Bactrian camel’s large intestine mucosal immunity system remain largely unknown. This study was aimed to describe the distribution characteristics and density of SIgA and IgG ASCs in the mucosal immunity tissues of Bactrian camel large intestine.
Materials and methods: Tissue samples were collected from different parts of the large intestines of 10 healthy adult Chinese Alashan Bactrian camels. Immunohistochemistry technology was used to determine the distribution of SIgA and IgG ASCs in the large intestine samples and the image-Pro Plus 6.0 was employed to calculate their densities.
Results: SIgA and IgG ASCs were distributed in lamina propria of the large intestine mucosa with some ASCs aggregating around the intestinal glands. The SIgA density increased from ileocecal orifice to the caecum and decreased from the colon to the rectum. The largest number of SIgA ASCs was observed in the caecum, followed by anterior colonic segments, ileocecal orifice, posterior colonic segments, and rectum, and the number of SIgA ASCs in the caecum was significantly larger than that in other four positions (p < 0.05). Similarly, the number of IgG ASCs was also the largest in the caecum, which was significantly higher than that in ileocecal orifice, anterior, posterior colonic segments, and rectum (p < 0.05).
Conclusions: Our findings suggest that SIgA and IgG ASCs are mainly distributed in intestinal mucosal immunity effector sites. These distribution characteristics provide evidence to support that SIgA and IgG supply effective protection and maintain homeostasis in the large intestinal mucosa.

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Keywords

Bactrian camel, large intestine, SIgA, IgG, antibody-secreting cells

About this article
Title

The distribution of SIgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells in the large intestine of Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus)

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 4 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

963-970

Published online

2022-06-10

Page views

3871

Article views/downloads

396

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0054

Pubmed

35692116

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(4):963-970.

Keywords

Bactrian camel
large intestine
SIgA
IgG
antibody-secreting cells

Authors

X. Wang
Y. Zhaxi
P. Li
W. Wang

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