open access

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2022-01-27
Accepted: 2022-03-28
Published online: 2022-04-20
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Determining anatomical localisations of cervical oesophagus, hiatal clamp and oesophagogastric junction with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy

E. Bozdag1, Z. Karaca Bozdag2, A. Kurkcuoglu3, A. Pamukcu Beyhan45, H. Bozkurt6, A. S. Senger6
·
Pubmed: 35481704
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(3):756-765.
Affiliations
  1. Gastroenterology Surgery Clinic, Kanuni Sultan Süleyman TRH, Health Sciences University, Istanbul, Türkiye
  2. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Yeni Yüzyıl University, Istanbul, Türkiye
  3. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Kırıkkale University, Kırıkkale, Türkiye
  4. Department of Business Administration, Land NCO Vocational School, National Defence University, Balikesir, Türkiye
  5. Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Ege University, Izmir, Türkiye
  6. Gastroenterology Surgery Clinic, Kartal Koşuyolu High Specialisation TRH, Health Sciences University, Istanbul, Türkiye

open access

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-01-27
Accepted: 2022-03-28
Published online: 2022-04-20

Abstract

Background: In this study, the purpose was to determine the anatomical localisations of the cervical oesophagus length, hiatal clamp, and oesophagogastric junction depending on age and gender in patients who undergo oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).
Materials and methods: The images of the patients who underwent EGD between 2018 and 2020 were analysed retrospectively in this study. The distance of the anatomical localisations of the cervical oesophagus length, hiatal clamp, and oesophagogastric junction to the anterior incisors, and the relations of this distance with the demographic characteristics and clinical manifestations of the patients were investigated on the EGD data.
Results: A total of 298 patients (174 women, 124 men) were included in the study. The cervical oesophagus length and the distance of the oesophagogastric junction and hiatal clamp localisation of the patients were found to be 15.06 ± 0.57 cm, 37.51 ± 2.23 cm and 38.62 ± 2.23 cm, respectively. It was also found that the mean values of all lengths in males were higher at a statistically significant level than in females (p < 0.001; p < 0.01).
Conclusions: Knowing these anatomical localisations may be important in predicting complications that may occur in this region in EGD and planning the precautions to be taken. We also believe that it will guide clinicians in determining hiatal hernia and related deficiencies.

Abstract

Background: In this study, the purpose was to determine the anatomical localisations of the cervical oesophagus length, hiatal clamp, and oesophagogastric junction depending on age and gender in patients who undergo oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).
Materials and methods: The images of the patients who underwent EGD between 2018 and 2020 were analysed retrospectively in this study. The distance of the anatomical localisations of the cervical oesophagus length, hiatal clamp, and oesophagogastric junction to the anterior incisors, and the relations of this distance with the demographic characteristics and clinical manifestations of the patients were investigated on the EGD data.
Results: A total of 298 patients (174 women, 124 men) were included in the study. The cervical oesophagus length and the distance of the oesophagogastric junction and hiatal clamp localisation of the patients were found to be 15.06 ± 0.57 cm, 37.51 ± 2.23 cm and 38.62 ± 2.23 cm, respectively. It was also found that the mean values of all lengths in males were higher at a statistically significant level than in females (p < 0.001; p < 0.01).
Conclusions: Knowing these anatomical localisations may be important in predicting complications that may occur in this region in EGD and planning the precautions to be taken. We also believe that it will guide clinicians in determining hiatal hernia and related deficiencies.

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Keywords

oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, cervical oesophagus length, hiatal clamp, oesophagogastric junction

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About this article
Title

Determining anatomical localisations of cervical oesophagus, hiatal clamp and oesophagogastric junction with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

756-765

Published online

2022-04-20

Page views

4011

Article views/downloads

691

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0041

Pubmed

35481704

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(3):756-765.

Keywords

oesophagogastroduodenoscopy
cervical oesophagus length
hiatal clamp
oesophagogastric junction

Authors

E. Bozdag
Z. Karaca Bozdag
A. Kurkcuoglu
A. Pamukcu Beyhan
H. Bozkurt
A. S. Senger

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