open access

Ahead of Print
Case report
Submitted: 2021-07-04
Accepted: 2021-10-11
Published online: 2021-10-21
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Double superior vena cava and left brachiocephalic vein agenesis: a rare systemic vein anomaly and potential source of CIED and CVC placement complications

R. Steckiewicz1, P. Stolarz2, M. Marchel2, M. Michalak2, D. Konecki3, E. Szczerba2, M. Kowara2, L. Grabowska-Derlatka3, M. Grabowski2
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0108
·
Pubmed: 34699053
Affiliations
  1. Department of Cardiology, Central University Hospital in Warsaw, Poland
  2. 1st Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  3. 2nd Departament of Radiology Medical University of Warsaw, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2021-07-04
Accepted: 2021-10-11
Published online: 2021-10-21

Abstract

Abnormal systemic vein development produces anomalous veins, which—in the case of persistent left superior vena cava and/or left brachiocephalic vein (BCV)—exhibit considerable topographic and morphometric differences in comparison with their usual anatomy. The nature and extent of those developmental anomalies—detected during intravenous procedures, such as cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) lead insertion or central venous catheter (CVC) placement—may hinder the procedure itself and/or adversely affect its outcome, both at the stage of cardiac lead advancement through an abnormally shaped vessel and lead positioning within the heart. This may lead to problems in achieving optimal sensing and pacing parameters and in ensuring that the patient cannot feel the pacing impulses. These events accompanied a de novo CIED implantation procedure in the patient with a double SVC and left BCV agenesis, who ultimately required reoperation.

Abstract

Abnormal systemic vein development produces anomalous veins, which—in the case of persistent left superior vena cava and/or left brachiocephalic vein (BCV)—exhibit considerable topographic and morphometric differences in comparison with their usual anatomy. The nature and extent of those developmental anomalies—detected during intravenous procedures, such as cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) lead insertion or central venous catheter (CVC) placement—may hinder the procedure itself and/or adversely affect its outcome, both at the stage of cardiac lead advancement through an abnormally shaped vessel and lead positioning within the heart. This may lead to problems in achieving optimal sensing and pacing parameters and in ensuring that the patient cannot feel the pacing impulses. These events accompanied a de novo CIED implantation procedure in the patient with a double SVC and left BCV agenesis, who ultimately required reoperation.

Get Citation

Keywords

persistent left superior vena cava, brachiocephalic vein, venous anomalies, venography, transthoracic echocardiogram, CIED, CVC

About this article
Title

Double superior vena cava and left brachiocephalic vein agenesis: a rare systemic vein anomaly and potential source of CIED and CVC placement complications

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Case report

Published online

2021-10-21

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0108

Pubmed

34699053

Keywords

persistent left superior vena cava
brachiocephalic vein
venous anomalies
venography
transthoracic echocardiogram
CIED
CVC

Authors

R. Steckiewicz
P. Stolarz
M. Marchel
M. Michalak
D. Konecki
E. Szczerba
M. Kowara
L. Grabowska-Derlatka
M. Grabowski

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