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Original article
Submitted: 2021-06-16
Accepted: 2021-09-08
Published online: 2021-10-07
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Immunity cells in the small intestinal mucosa of newborn yaks

Z. Qian1, C. Yan1, Y. Sijiu2, H. Junfeng1, P. Yangyang2, B. Zhanchun1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0102
·
Pubmed: 34642930
Affiliations
  1. College of Veterinary Medicine, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou, Gansu, China
  2. Gansu Province Livestock Embryo Engineering Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou, Gansu, China

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-06-16
Accepted: 2021-09-08
Published online: 2021-10-07

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to characterize and evaluate the main markers of T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG plasmocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells of the intestinal mucosa of newborn yaks.

Materials and methods: Ten newborn yaks (2–4 weeks old) were choosed. Immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to analyze the immune cell distribution and specific markers at the mRNA expression level in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum.

Results: The results showed in the epithelium, CD3-positive T lymphocyte levels were higher than other immune cell levels (P<0.05). Additionally, in the lamina propria, the number of cells positive for CD3, CD68, and signal inhibitory regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) were higher in the villi, while CD79α, IgA, and IgG cells were more common at the base of the crypt. Moreover, both in the epithelium and lamina propria, the number of CD3, CD68 and SIRPα were decreased from the duodenum to the ileum (P<0.05), additionally the number of CD79α, IgA and IgG positive cells were increased from the duodenum to the ileum of newborn yaks (P<0.05). Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of CD3ε, CD68, and SIRPα increased from the duodenum to the ileum (P<0.05), while the mRNA expression levels of CD79α, IgA, and IgG decreased from the duodenum to the ileum.

Conclusions: Immunohistochemical characterization and expression levels of immune factors in the small intestinal mucosa of newborn yaks suggest that the intestinal mucosa is an important part of the natural barrier and provides useful references for immunity functions of newborn yak intestinal mucosa.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to characterize and evaluate the main markers of T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG plasmocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells of the intestinal mucosa of newborn yaks.

Materials and methods: Ten newborn yaks (2–4 weeks old) were choosed. Immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to analyze the immune cell distribution and specific markers at the mRNA expression level in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum.

Results: The results showed in the epithelium, CD3-positive T lymphocyte levels were higher than other immune cell levels (P<0.05). Additionally, in the lamina propria, the number of cells positive for CD3, CD68, and signal inhibitory regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) were higher in the villi, while CD79α, IgA, and IgG cells were more common at the base of the crypt. Moreover, both in the epithelium and lamina propria, the number of CD3, CD68 and SIRPα were decreased from the duodenum to the ileum (P<0.05), additionally the number of CD79α, IgA and IgG positive cells were increased from the duodenum to the ileum of newborn yaks (P<0.05). Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of CD3ε, CD68, and SIRPα increased from the duodenum to the ileum (P<0.05), while the mRNA expression levels of CD79α, IgA, and IgG decreased from the duodenum to the ileum.

Conclusions: Immunohistochemical characterization and expression levels of immune factors in the small intestinal mucosa of newborn yaks suggest that the intestinal mucosa is an important part of the natural barrier and provides useful references for immunity functions of newborn yak intestinal mucosa.

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Keywords

newborn yaks, small intestine, mucosa, immunity cell

About this article
Title

Immunity cells in the small intestinal mucosa of newborn yaks

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-10-07

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0102

Pubmed

34642930

Keywords

newborn yaks
small intestine
mucosa
immunity cell

Authors

Z. Qian
C. Yan
Y. Sijiu
H. Junfeng
P. Yangyang
B. Zhanchun

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