open access

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2021-05-22
Accepted: 2021-07-05
Published online: 2021-08-03
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A potential role of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood in ameliorating psoriasis-like skin lesion in the rats

S. S. Attia1, M. Rafla1, N. E. El-Nefiawy1, H. F. Abdel Hamid1, M. A. Amin1, M. A. Fetouh1
·
Pubmed: 34355785
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(3):614-631.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Abbasia, Cairo, Egypt

open access

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-05-22
Accepted: 2021-07-05
Published online: 2021-08-03

Abstract

Background: Psoriasis is a common autoimmune inflammatory skin disease, with no clear cause, treated with topical agents and phototherapy, conventional immunosuppressant drugs and biologic agents. Stem cell therapy has generated significant interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study was to use mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy compared to the topical application of the standard conventional corticosteroid cream.
Materials and methods: Forty male adult albino rats were used, divided into four groups, 10 rats each: group I (control), group II (psoriasis-like lesions induced by usage of Aldara cream), group III (treated with betamethasone) and group IV (treated with MSCs). Specimens were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s trichrome, immune-histochemical technique for CD4, CD8 and CD31. Ultra-sections were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination.
Results: Mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated efficacy in reduction of disease severity in the form of uniform epidermal thickness covered by a very thin keratin layer. Normally arranged layers of epidermal layers, with a clear border demarcation, were seen between the epidermis and the dermis with apparently intact basement membrane. TEM showed absence of gaps between the tightly connected cells of the basal layer and the resting basement membrane.
Conclusions: Application of MSCs raises hope for developing a new, safe and effective therapy for psoriatic patients, avoiding the side effects of betamethasone.

Abstract

Background: Psoriasis is a common autoimmune inflammatory skin disease, with no clear cause, treated with topical agents and phototherapy, conventional immunosuppressant drugs and biologic agents. Stem cell therapy has generated significant interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study was to use mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy compared to the topical application of the standard conventional corticosteroid cream.
Materials and methods: Forty male adult albino rats were used, divided into four groups, 10 rats each: group I (control), group II (psoriasis-like lesions induced by usage of Aldara cream), group III (treated with betamethasone) and group IV (treated with MSCs). Specimens were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s trichrome, immune-histochemical technique for CD4, CD8 and CD31. Ultra-sections were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination.
Results: Mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated efficacy in reduction of disease severity in the form of uniform epidermal thickness covered by a very thin keratin layer. Normally arranged layers of epidermal layers, with a clear border demarcation, were seen between the epidermis and the dermis with apparently intact basement membrane. TEM showed absence of gaps between the tightly connected cells of the basal layer and the resting basement membrane.
Conclusions: Application of MSCs raises hope for developing a new, safe and effective therapy for psoriatic patients, avoiding the side effects of betamethasone.

Get Citation

Keywords

psoriasis, human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells, rat, imiquimod cream, CD4, CD8, CD31, electron microscopy

About this article
Title

A potential role of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood in ameliorating psoriasis-like skin lesion in the rats

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

614-631

Published online

2021-08-03

Page views

4992

Article views/downloads

1338

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0076

Pubmed

34355785

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(3):614-631.

Keywords

psoriasis
human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells
rat
imiquimod cream
CD4
CD8
CD31
electron microscopy

Authors

S. S. Attia
M. Rafla
N. E. El-Nefiawy
H. F. Abdel Hamid
M. A. Amin
M. A. Fetouh

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