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Original article
Submitted: 2021-05-06
Accepted: 2021-07-26
Published online: 2021-08-24
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Morphologic comparison of blood vessels used for coronary artery bypass surgery

M. Garnizone1, E. Vartina1, M. Pilmane1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0084
·
Pubmed: 34608982
Affiliations
  1. Department of Morphology, Institute of Anatomy and Anthropology, Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-05-06
Accepted: 2021-07-26
Published online: 2021-08-24

Abstract

Background: Aim of this study was to evaluate morphologic features of healthy saphenous vein and internal thoracic artery used in coronary artery bypass surgery and compare results.

Materials and methods: Ten specimens of saphenous veins and ten of internal thoracic arteries used for coronary artery bypass graft were obtained from 20 patients. Histological routine and immunohistochemical staining was performed with: endothelin (ET), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP2), metallomembranoproteinase 2 (MMP2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF β), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM). A semiquantitative evaluation method was used.

Results: There was found: moderate positive endothelin-containing cells in both blood vessel types; moderate positive MMP2 cells and moderate to numerous positive TIMP2 cells in veins. In arteries – occasionally marked positive MMP2 cells and negative TIMP2; moderate to numerous positive VEGF endothelial cells on small blood vessels in vein wall and occasional in artery wall; numerous TGFβ structures in veins and abundance of VCAM, ICAM positive cells, few in arteries; few HGF positive structures in veins, negative in arteries; In veins few PGP9,5 positive nerve fibres, in arteries - moderate. Moderate TUNEL reaction positive apoptotic cells in veins and few to moderate in arteries.

Conclusions: V.saphena magna grafts are characterized by more intensive modelation plasticity. Number of VEGF, VCAM and ICAM found in v.saphena magna proves the possible tendency of graft failure on basis of local blood supply intensification. Appearance of endothelin positive cells indicate the similar homeostasis condition in endotheliocytes in both – vein and artery grafts.

Abstract

Background: Aim of this study was to evaluate morphologic features of healthy saphenous vein and internal thoracic artery used in coronary artery bypass surgery and compare results.

Materials and methods: Ten specimens of saphenous veins and ten of internal thoracic arteries used for coronary artery bypass graft were obtained from 20 patients. Histological routine and immunohistochemical staining was performed with: endothelin (ET), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP2), metallomembranoproteinase 2 (MMP2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF β), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM). A semiquantitative evaluation method was used.

Results: There was found: moderate positive endothelin-containing cells in both blood vessel types; moderate positive MMP2 cells and moderate to numerous positive TIMP2 cells in veins. In arteries – occasionally marked positive MMP2 cells and negative TIMP2; moderate to numerous positive VEGF endothelial cells on small blood vessels in vein wall and occasional in artery wall; numerous TGFβ structures in veins and abundance of VCAM, ICAM positive cells, few in arteries; few HGF positive structures in veins, negative in arteries; In veins few PGP9,5 positive nerve fibres, in arteries - moderate. Moderate TUNEL reaction positive apoptotic cells in veins and few to moderate in arteries.

Conclusions: V.saphena magna grafts are characterized by more intensive modelation plasticity. Number of VEGF, VCAM and ICAM found in v.saphena magna proves the possible tendency of graft failure on basis of local blood supply intensification. Appearance of endothelin positive cells indicate the similar homeostasis condition in endotheliocytes in both – vein and artery grafts.

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Keywords

saphenous vein, internal thoracic artery, immunohistochemistry

About this article
Title

Morphologic comparison of blood vessels used for coronary artery bypass surgery

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-08-24

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414

Article views/downloads

247

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0084

Pubmed

34608982

Keywords

saphenous vein
internal thoracic artery
immunohistochemistry

Authors

M. Garnizone
E. Vartina
M. Pilmane

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