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Original article
Submitted: 2020-11-12
Accepted: 2021-01-08
Published online: 2021-01-29
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Comparative study on the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus platelet rich plasma on the pancreas of adult male albino rats with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes mellitus

H. El-Haroun1, R. M. Salama2
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0008
·
Pubmed: 33559114
Affiliations
  1. Department of Histology, Faculty of medicine, Menoufia University, Menoufia, Egypt
  2. Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Menoufia, Egypt

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-11-12
Accepted: 2021-01-08
Published online: 2021-01-29

Abstract

The optimal treatment for autoimmune type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM) is endogenous regeneration of the pancreatic β-cell. This can be achieved either by transplanting mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from the bone marrow or injecting platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Current research reviewed a TIDM model and compared the effect of BMSCs on exocrine and endocrine pancreas portions versus PRP. Rats divided into four groups: Control group, Diabetic group (single STZ dose 60 mg / kg I.P), Diabetic + PRP group (PRP, 0.5 ml/kg SC twice weekly/4 weeks given to diabetic rats) and Diabetic + BMSCs group (1 ml of PKH26 labeled MSCs suspension in BPS (3x106 cells/ml) IV to diabetic rats. Glucose, amylase and lipase levels were calculated and pancreases were designed for light, electron microscopic, immunohistochemistry, morphometry and statistical analysis. Diabetic rats exhibited elevated glucose, decreased amylase and lipase compared to control rats. In addition, variable histological degenerative changes in the form of congested blood vessels have been identified with a significant increase in the mean area percentage of collagen, a significant decrease in the diameter of the islets, the number of islet cells in Langerhans and the number of zymogen granules. Ultrastructural findings exhibited distorted Golgi, degenerated mitochondria, pyknotic nuclei, and few secretory B-cell granules. Administration of BMSCs to diabetic group significantly increased the number of cells and diameter of Langerhans islets and the number of zymogen granules compared to Diabetic group as well as Diabetic + PRP group. BMSCs could be considered more efficient than PRP in the treatment of type I diabetes.

Abstract

The optimal treatment for autoimmune type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM) is endogenous regeneration of the pancreatic β-cell. This can be achieved either by transplanting mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from the bone marrow or injecting platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Current research reviewed a TIDM model and compared the effect of BMSCs on exocrine and endocrine pancreas portions versus PRP. Rats divided into four groups: Control group, Diabetic group (single STZ dose 60 mg / kg I.P), Diabetic + PRP group (PRP, 0.5 ml/kg SC twice weekly/4 weeks given to diabetic rats) and Diabetic + BMSCs group (1 ml of PKH26 labeled MSCs suspension in BPS (3x106 cells/ml) IV to diabetic rats. Glucose, amylase and lipase levels were calculated and pancreases were designed for light, electron microscopic, immunohistochemistry, morphometry and statistical analysis. Diabetic rats exhibited elevated glucose, decreased amylase and lipase compared to control rats. In addition, variable histological degenerative changes in the form of congested blood vessels have been identified with a significant increase in the mean area percentage of collagen, a significant decrease in the diameter of the islets, the number of islet cells in Langerhans and the number of zymogen granules. Ultrastructural findings exhibited distorted Golgi, degenerated mitochondria, pyknotic nuclei, and few secretory B-cell granules. Administration of BMSCs to diabetic group significantly increased the number of cells and diameter of Langerhans islets and the number of zymogen granules compared to Diabetic group as well as Diabetic + PRP group. BMSCs could be considered more efficient than PRP in the treatment of type I diabetes.

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Keywords

type I diabetes mellitus, streptozotocin, BMSCs, PRP, anti-insulin antibody

About this article
Title

Comparative study on the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus platelet rich plasma on the pancreas of adult male albino rats with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes mellitus

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-01-29

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0008

Pubmed

33559114

Keywords

type I diabetes mellitus
streptozotocin
BMSCs
PRP
anti-insulin antibody

Authors

H. El-Haroun
R. M. Salama

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