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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-08-07
Submitted: 2020-07-08
Accepted: 2020-07-25
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Small intestinal mucosal cells in piglets fed with probiotic and zinc: a qualitative and quantitative microanatomical study

A. Kalita, M. Talukdar, K. Sarma, P. C. Kalita, P. Roychoudhury, G. Kalita, O. P. Choudhary, J. K. Chaudhary, P. J. Doley, S. Debroy
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0091
·
Pubmed: 32789842

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-08-07
Submitted: 2020-07-08
Accepted: 2020-07-25

Abstract

Background: Probiotics and zinc are commonly used and beneficial in pig production. This work aimed to assess the effects of probiotic and zinc on the mucosal cells of the small intestine in respect to digestive capacity and immunity in pre and post-weaned piglets. 

Materials and methods: Eighteen LWY piglets were divided equally into control and treatment groups. The piglets were maintained in standard management conditions and were weaned at 28 days of age. The treatment group of piglets fed a mixture of probiotics orally @ 1.25 x 109 CFU/day and zinc @ 2000 ppm/day from birth to 10 days of age. At three different age-groups viz. day 20 (pre-weaning) and, day 30 and day 60 (post-weaning), the animals were sacrificed. For histomorphology, the tissue samples were processed and stained with Mayer’s hematoxylin and eosin for routine study, combined PAS-Alcian blue for mucopolysaccharides and Masson-Hamperl argentaffin technique for argentaffin cells. The stained slides were observed under the microscope. The samples were processed as per the standard procedure for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The statistical analysis of the data using the appropriate statistical tests was also conducted.

Results: The mucosal epithelium of villi and crypts were lined by enterocytes, goblet cells, argentaffin cells, microfold (M-cell) cells, tuft cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). The multipotent stem cells were located at the crypt base. The length of the enterocyte microvilli was significantly longer (P<0.05) in the treatment group of piglets. The number of different types of goblet cells and argentaffin cells was more in treated piglets irrespective of segments of intestine and age. The IEL was located in apical, nuclear and basal positions in the lining epithelium of both villus tip and base with their significant increased in the treatment group of piglets. The TEM revealed the frequent occurrence of tuft cells in the lining mucosa of the small intestine in treated piglets.

Conclusions: Dietary supplementation of probiotic and zinc induced the number of different mucosal cells of villi and crypts in the small intestine that might suggest the greater absorptive capacity of nutrients and effective immunity in critical pre and post-weaned piglets.

Abstract

Background: Probiotics and zinc are commonly used and beneficial in pig production. This work aimed to assess the effects of probiotic and zinc on the mucosal cells of the small intestine in respect to digestive capacity and immunity in pre and post-weaned piglets. 

Materials and methods: Eighteen LWY piglets were divided equally into control and treatment groups. The piglets were maintained in standard management conditions and were weaned at 28 days of age. The treatment group of piglets fed a mixture of probiotics orally @ 1.25 x 109 CFU/day and zinc @ 2000 ppm/day from birth to 10 days of age. At three different age-groups viz. day 20 (pre-weaning) and, day 30 and day 60 (post-weaning), the animals were sacrificed. For histomorphology, the tissue samples were processed and stained with Mayer’s hematoxylin and eosin for routine study, combined PAS-Alcian blue for mucopolysaccharides and Masson-Hamperl argentaffin technique for argentaffin cells. The stained slides were observed under the microscope. The samples were processed as per the standard procedure for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The statistical analysis of the data using the appropriate statistical tests was also conducted.

Results: The mucosal epithelium of villi and crypts were lined by enterocytes, goblet cells, argentaffin cells, microfold (M-cell) cells, tuft cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). The multipotent stem cells were located at the crypt base. The length of the enterocyte microvilli was significantly longer (P<0.05) in the treatment group of piglets. The number of different types of goblet cells and argentaffin cells was more in treated piglets irrespective of segments of intestine and age. The IEL was located in apical, nuclear and basal positions in the lining epithelium of both villus tip and base with their significant increased in the treatment group of piglets. The TEM revealed the frequent occurrence of tuft cells in the lining mucosa of the small intestine in treated piglets.

Conclusions: Dietary supplementation of probiotic and zinc induced the number of different mucosal cells of villi and crypts in the small intestine that might suggest the greater absorptive capacity of nutrients and effective immunity in critical pre and post-weaned piglets.

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Keywords

probiotic, zinc, lining cells, small intestine, piglets

About this article
Title

Small intestinal mucosal cells in piglets fed with probiotic and zinc: a qualitative and quantitative microanatomical study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2020-08-07

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0091

Pubmed

32789842

Keywords

probiotic
zinc
lining cells
small intestine
piglets

Authors

A. Kalita
M. Talukdar
K. Sarma
P. C. Kalita
P. Roychoudhury
G. Kalita
O. P. Choudhary
J. K. Chaudhary
P. J. Doley
S. Debroy

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