open access

Vol 80, No 1 (2021)
Original article
Submitted: 2020-02-10
Accepted: 2020-02-26
Published online: 2020-03-18
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Evaluation of the middle ear in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) by gross anatomy and cone-beam computed tomography

J. Nourinezhad1, M. Abedini2, M. M. Shamsi3, A. Dabbaghi4, M. Janeczek5
·
Pubmed: 32207849
·
Folia Morphol 2021;80(1):177-185.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Anatomy and Embryology, Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran, Islamic Republic Of
  2. D.V.M. Student of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran
  3. Graduated Ph. D. Student of Comparative Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran.
  4. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dental School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
  5. Division of Animal Anatomy, Department of Biostructure and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University o Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland

open access

Vol 80, No 1 (2021)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-02-10
Accepted: 2020-02-26
Published online: 2020-03-18

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to provide a description of gross middle ear morphology in water buffaloes, augmented with additional data on the osseous structures of middle ear derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

Materials and methods: Skulls of 10 young adult male water buffaloes were used to examine their middle ears.

Results: Anatomical features noted included the presence of tympanic cells in the tympanic bulla, the location of malleus head and neck, and all of incus in the dorsal epitympanic recess, the oval tympanic membrane, absence of a prominent notch on the articular surface of malleus, positional variations of the lateral process of malleus relative to the muscular process and muscular process relative to the rostral process of malleus, absence of complete coverage of the articular facet of malleus head by incus body, and presence of the lenticular process of incus. In CBCT images, the osseous part of external acoustic meatus, the petrous part of temporal bone and the details of the ossicles were seen, except for stapes.

Conclusions: Although tympanic membrane, malleus and stapes of water buffaloes are similar to those of ox, the incus of water buffaloes is more similar to that of goats. The heaviest ossicles among the ruminants studied belonged to water buffaloes; the mean length of malleus head and neck, total length and width of incus body as well as length of stapes head were greatest in water buffaloes too. The auditory ossicles of water buffaloes show ‘transitional type’ morphological characteristics. These features suggest a relatively wide frequency range of hearing, but not one biased towards especially low or especially high frequencies.

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to provide a description of gross middle ear morphology in water buffaloes, augmented with additional data on the osseous structures of middle ear derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

Materials and methods: Skulls of 10 young adult male water buffaloes were used to examine their middle ears.

Results: Anatomical features noted included the presence of tympanic cells in the tympanic bulla, the location of malleus head and neck, and all of incus in the dorsal epitympanic recess, the oval tympanic membrane, absence of a prominent notch on the articular surface of malleus, positional variations of the lateral process of malleus relative to the muscular process and muscular process relative to the rostral process of malleus, absence of complete coverage of the articular facet of malleus head by incus body, and presence of the lenticular process of incus. In CBCT images, the osseous part of external acoustic meatus, the petrous part of temporal bone and the details of the ossicles were seen, except for stapes.

Conclusions: Although tympanic membrane, malleus and stapes of water buffaloes are similar to those of ox, the incus of water buffaloes is more similar to that of goats. The heaviest ossicles among the ruminants studied belonged to water buffaloes; the mean length of malleus head and neck, total length and width of incus body as well as length of stapes head were greatest in water buffaloes too. The auditory ossicles of water buffaloes show ‘transitional type’ morphological characteristics. These features suggest a relatively wide frequency range of hearing, but not one biased towards especially low or especially high frequencies.

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Keywords

anatomy, auditory ossicles, cone-beam computed tomography, middle ear, morphometry, water buffalo

About this article
Title

Evaluation of the middle ear in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) by gross anatomy and cone-beam computed tomography

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 80, No 1 (2021)

Article type

Original article

Pages

177-185

Published online

2020-03-18

Page views

1467

Article views/downloads

1354

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0036

Pubmed

32207849

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2021;80(1):177-185.

Keywords

anatomy
auditory ossicles
cone-beam computed tomography
middle ear
morphometry
water buffalo

Authors

J. Nourinezhad
M. Abedini
M. M. Shamsi
A. Dabbaghi
M. Janeczek

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