open access

Vol 79, No 3 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-11-15
Submitted: 2019-09-30
Accepted: 2019-10-31
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A morphological study of retromolar foramen and retromolar canal of modern and medieval population

I. Komarnitki, H. Pliszka, P. Roszkiewicz, A. Chloupek
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0124
·
Pubmed: 31750537
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(3):580-587.

open access

Vol 79, No 3 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-11-15
Submitted: 2019-09-30
Accepted: 2019-10-31

Abstract

Background: Retromolar foramen (RMF) is small external orifice of the retromolar canal (RMC), located in the retromolar region of the mandible. Knowledge about the location of the RMF and the route of the RMC within the mandible is significant for clinical practice due to a high risk of injury during oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery.

Materials and methods: In this study, the authors analysed 100 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of the modern people’s retromolar region and 26 scans of samples from the medieval population. Additionally, 74 retromolar regions of the medieval people were examined macroscopically.

Results: The statistical analysis showed a correlation between the frequency of RMC occurrence and bone thickness on the medial surface of the RMC. Also it was proven that the results of the RMF identification based on macroscopic examination of the bone may be falsely negative or positive and it is caused by destruction caused by resting in soil.

Conclusions: Thus, CBCT is the best tool for RMF and RMC identification.

Abstract

Background: Retromolar foramen (RMF) is small external orifice of the retromolar canal (RMC), located in the retromolar region of the mandible. Knowledge about the location of the RMF and the route of the RMC within the mandible is significant for clinical practice due to a high risk of injury during oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery.

Materials and methods: In this study, the authors analysed 100 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of the modern people’s retromolar region and 26 scans of samples from the medieval population. Additionally, 74 retromolar regions of the medieval people were examined macroscopically.

Results: The statistical analysis showed a correlation between the frequency of RMC occurrence and bone thickness on the medial surface of the RMC. Also it was proven that the results of the RMF identification based on macroscopic examination of the bone may be falsely negative or positive and it is caused by destruction caused by resting in soil.

Conclusions: Thus, CBCT is the best tool for RMF and RMC identification.

Get Citation

Keywords

retromolar foramen; retromolar canal; cone-beam computed tomography

About this article
Title

A morphological study of retromolar foramen and retromolar canal of modern and medieval population

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 3 (2020)

Pages

580-587

Published online

2019-11-15

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0124

Pubmed

31750537

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(3):580-587.

Keywords

retromolar foramen
retromolar canal
cone-beam computed tomography

Authors

I. Komarnitki
H. Pliszka
P. Roszkiewicz
A. Chloupek

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