open access

Vol 79, No 3 (2020)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-10-29
Submitted: 2019-08-27
Accepted: 2019-10-05
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Vertebral arteries bilaterally passing through stellate (cervicothoracic) ganglion

B. Chaudhary, P. R. Tripathy, M. R. Gaikwad
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0115
·
Pubmed: 31688949
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(3):621-626.

open access

Vol 79, No 3 (2020)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-10-29
Submitted: 2019-08-27
Accepted: 2019-10-05

Abstract

Vertebral artery is a branch of the first part of subclavian artery. Vertebral artery arising from the aortic arch most commonly presents on the left side. The cervical part of sympathetic trunk is closely related to the vertebral artery in the cervical region. Though lots of variations regarding anomalous origin, course of vertebral artery is reported in the literature, here we present a rare anomaly in which vertebral artery after originating from aortic arch is passing through stellate ganglia and it enters into the transverse foramina of higher cervical vertebra (C5). Such variation should be kept in mind by anaesthetist during stellate ganglion block in order to relieve intractable pain in central nervous system lesion. Surgeons should keep this anomaly in mind during cervical spine surgery otherwise vertebral artery may get injured leading to haemorrhage.

Abstract

Vertebral artery is a branch of the first part of subclavian artery. Vertebral artery arising from the aortic arch most commonly presents on the left side. The cervical part of sympathetic trunk is closely related to the vertebral artery in the cervical region. Though lots of variations regarding anomalous origin, course of vertebral artery is reported in the literature, here we present a rare anomaly in which vertebral artery after originating from aortic arch is passing through stellate ganglia and it enters into the transverse foramina of higher cervical vertebra (C5). Such variation should be kept in mind by anaesthetist during stellate ganglion block in order to relieve intractable pain in central nervous system lesion. Surgeons should keep this anomaly in mind during cervical spine surgery otherwise vertebral artery may get injured leading to haemorrhage.

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Keywords

aortic arch; haemodynamic; Horner syndrome; sympathetic ganglia; vertebral artery

About this article
Title

Vertebral arteries bilaterally passing through stellate (cervicothoracic) ganglion

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 3 (2020)

Pages

621-626

Published online

2019-10-29

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0115

Pubmed

31688949

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(3):621-626.

Keywords

aortic arch
haemodynamic
Horner syndrome
sympathetic ganglia
vertebral artery

Authors

B. Chaudhary
P. R. Tripathy
M. R. Gaikwad

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