open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-07-07
Accepted: 2019-08-11
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Endometrial immunocompetent cells in proliferative and secretory phase of normal menstrual cycle

D. Radović Janošević, M. Trandafilović, D. Krtinić, H. Čolović, J. Milošević Stevanović, S. Pop-Trajković Dinić
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0095
·
Pubmed: 31448399
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):296-302.

open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-07-07
Accepted: 2019-08-11

Abstract

Background: Menstruation was presented as a result of inflammatory process. The total and relative numbers of the endometrial immunocompetitive cells vary during the different phases of the menstrual cycle. The aim of this morphological study is to make a contribution to understanding different distribution of leukocyte types during proliferative and secretory phase of normal menstrual cycle.

Materials and methods: The study included 40 women (20 in proliferative and 20 in secretory phase of the menstrual cycle). Exploratory curettage performed as preoperative preparation due to uterine myomas. Immunophenotyping was performed by immunoalkaline phosphatase (APAAP) using monoclonal antibodies: CD15, CD20, CD30, CD45RO, CD56, CD57 and CD68. The results were statistically analysed using SPSS 20.0 software.

Results: Natural killer (NK) cells are dominant during secretory, and CD45RO T lymphocytes are dominant during proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. During the secretory phase of menstrual cycle, leukocytes make 30% of total endometrial cells. NK cells (CD56+ bright subpopulation), activated T lymphocytes, macrophages and B lymphocytes significantly increase in their number during the secretory phase of menstrual cycle.

Conclusions: Significant changes in endometrial leukocyte populations during proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle are emphasized. Changes in dominance of different leukocyte subpopulations are determined by hormonal and microenvironmental changes in modulatory factors that have not yet been fully explained.

Abstract

Background: Menstruation was presented as a result of inflammatory process. The total and relative numbers of the endometrial immunocompetitive cells vary during the different phases of the menstrual cycle. The aim of this morphological study is to make a contribution to understanding different distribution of leukocyte types during proliferative and secretory phase of normal menstrual cycle.

Materials and methods: The study included 40 women (20 in proliferative and 20 in secretory phase of the menstrual cycle). Exploratory curettage performed as preoperative preparation due to uterine myomas. Immunophenotyping was performed by immunoalkaline phosphatase (APAAP) using monoclonal antibodies: CD15, CD20, CD30, CD45RO, CD56, CD57 and CD68. The results were statistically analysed using SPSS 20.0 software.

Results: Natural killer (NK) cells are dominant during secretory, and CD45RO T lymphocytes are dominant during proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. During the secretory phase of menstrual cycle, leukocytes make 30% of total endometrial cells. NK cells (CD56+ bright subpopulation), activated T lymphocytes, macrophages and B lymphocytes significantly increase in their number during the secretory phase of menstrual cycle.

Conclusions: Significant changes in endometrial leukocyte populations during proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle are emphasized. Changes in dominance of different leukocyte subpopulations are determined by hormonal and microenvironmental changes in modulatory factors that have not yet been fully explained.

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Keywords

menstrual cycle, endometrium, leukocyte, immune cells, NK cells

About this article
Title

Endometrial immunocompetent cells in proliferative and secretory phase of normal menstrual cycle

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)

Pages

296-302

Published online

2019-08-22

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0095

Pubmed

31448399

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):296-302.

Keywords

menstrual cycle
endometrium
leukocyte
immune cells
NK cells

Authors

D. Radović Janošević
M. Trandafilović
D. Krtinić
H. Čolović
J. Milošević Stevanović
S. Pop-Trajković Dinić

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