open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-06-27
Accepted: 2019-08-06
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Overview of nuclear bodies and their classification in the Terminologia Histologica

M. Muñoz, B. Vásquez, M. del Sol
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0091
·
Pubmed: 31448403
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):311-317.

open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-06-27
Accepted: 2019-08-06

Abstract

Background: Nuclear bodies (NB) are membrane-less subnuclear organelles that perform important functions in the cell, such as transcription, RNA splicing, processing and transport of ribosomal pre-RNA, epigenetic regulation, and others. The aim of the work was to analyse the classification of NB in the Terminologia Histologica (TH) and biological and bibliographical databases.

Materials and methods: The semantic structure of the Nucleoplasm section in the TH was analysed and unsystematic bibliographical search was made in the PubMed, SciELO, EMBASE databases and European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) biology database to identify which structures are classified as NB.

Results: It was found that the terms Corpusculum convolutum, Macula interchromatinea and Corpusculum PML are not correctly classified in the TH, since they are subordinated under the term Chromatinum and not under Corpusculum nucleare. The bibliography consulted showed that 100%, 92.6% and 81.5% of articles mentioned Corpusculum convolutum, Macula interchromatinea and Corpusculum PML, respectively as nuclear bodies.

Conclusions: It is suggested to relocate the terms Corpusculum convolutum, Macula interchromatinea and Corpusculum PML with the name of Corpusculum nucleare and the incorporation of two new entities to the Histological Terminology according to the information collected: paraspeckles and histone locus body.

Abstract

Background: Nuclear bodies (NB) are membrane-less subnuclear organelles that perform important functions in the cell, such as transcription, RNA splicing, processing and transport of ribosomal pre-RNA, epigenetic regulation, and others. The aim of the work was to analyse the classification of NB in the Terminologia Histologica (TH) and biological and bibliographical databases.

Materials and methods: The semantic structure of the Nucleoplasm section in the TH was analysed and unsystematic bibliographical search was made in the PubMed, SciELO, EMBASE databases and European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) biology database to identify which structures are classified as NB.

Results: It was found that the terms Corpusculum convolutum, Macula interchromatinea and Corpusculum PML are not correctly classified in the TH, since they are subordinated under the term Chromatinum and not under Corpusculum nucleare. The bibliography consulted showed that 100%, 92.6% and 81.5% of articles mentioned Corpusculum convolutum, Macula interchromatinea and Corpusculum PML, respectively as nuclear bodies.

Conclusions: It is suggested to relocate the terms Corpusculum convolutum, Macula interchromatinea and Corpusculum PML with the name of Corpusculum nucleare and the incorporation of two new entities to the Histological Terminology according to the information collected: paraspeckles and histone locus body.

Get Citation

Keywords

nuclear bodies, Terminologia Histologica, coiled bodies, PML nuclear bodies, nuclear speckles

About this article
Title

Overview of nuclear bodies and their classification in the Terminologia Histologica

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)

Pages

311-317

Published online

2019-08-22

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0091

Pubmed

31448403

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):311-317.

Keywords

nuclear bodies
Terminologia Histologica
coiled bodies
PML nuclear bodies
nuclear speckles

Authors

M. Muñoz
B. Vásquez
M. del Sol

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