open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-17
Submitted: 2019-06-06
Accepted: 2019-07-10
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Histological study of intestinal goblet cells, IgA, and CD3+ lymphocyte distribution in Huang-huai white goat

J. Zhou, W. Zhang, W. Liu, J. Sheng, M. Li, X. Chen, R. Dong
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0082
·
Pubmed: 31322724
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):303-310.

open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-17
Submitted: 2019-06-06
Accepted: 2019-07-10

Abstract

Background: Ten healthy adult Huang-huai white goats were selected and sacrificed by jugular vein bleeding after anaesthesia to observe the distribution characteristics of the histological structure of the intestinal mucosa, goblet cells, IgA, and CD3+ lymphocytes. Materials and methods: Three sections of the duodenum, the jejunum, and the ileum were immediately collected and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde for 72 h to prepare tissue sections. After haematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid Schiff, and immunohistochemical staining was performed, the distribution characteristics of goblet cells, IgA-positive cells, and CD3+ lymphocytes were observed. Results showed high columnar epithelial cells in the duodenum and jejunum of Huang-huai white goat and low columnar epithelial cells in the ileum mucosa. Results: Mucopolysaccharides secreted by intestinal goblet cells were mainly neutral, and the number of ileum goblet cells was significantly higher than that of the duodenum and the jejunum (p < 0.05). IgA-positive cells were distributed in the lamina propria of the duodenum, and the number of cells was significantly higher than that in the jejunum and the ileum (p < 0.01). The significant difference was found between the jejunum and the ileum (p < 0.01). The CD3+ cells in the intestinal mucosa were distributed in the lamina propria mucosae, and some of the positive cells in the jejunum were distributed between epithelial cells. CD3+ cells had the largest number in the jejunal lamina propria but had the lowest number in the ileum. Conclusions: The jejunum was significantly higher than the duodenum (p < 0.05), and the ileum was much less than the jejunum (p < 0.01).

Abstract

Background: Ten healthy adult Huang-huai white goats were selected and sacrificed by jugular vein bleeding after anaesthesia to observe the distribution characteristics of the histological structure of the intestinal mucosa, goblet cells, IgA, and CD3+ lymphocytes. Materials and methods: Three sections of the duodenum, the jejunum, and the ileum were immediately collected and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde for 72 h to prepare tissue sections. After haematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid Schiff, and immunohistochemical staining was performed, the distribution characteristics of goblet cells, IgA-positive cells, and CD3+ lymphocytes were observed. Results showed high columnar epithelial cells in the duodenum and jejunum of Huang-huai white goat and low columnar epithelial cells in the ileum mucosa. Results: Mucopolysaccharides secreted by intestinal goblet cells were mainly neutral, and the number of ileum goblet cells was significantly higher than that of the duodenum and the jejunum (p < 0.05). IgA-positive cells were distributed in the lamina propria of the duodenum, and the number of cells was significantly higher than that in the jejunum and the ileum (p < 0.01). The significant difference was found between the jejunum and the ileum (p < 0.01). The CD3+ cells in the intestinal mucosa were distributed in the lamina propria mucosae, and some of the positive cells in the jejunum were distributed between epithelial cells. CD3+ cells had the largest number in the jejunal lamina propria but had the lowest number in the ileum. Conclusions: The jejunum was significantly higher than the duodenum (p < 0.05), and the ileum was much less than the jejunum (p < 0.01).

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Keywords

goblet cells, IgA, CD3+, small intestine, Huang-huai white goat

About this article
Title

Histological study of intestinal goblet cells, IgA, and CD3+ lymphocyte distribution in Huang-huai white goat

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)

Pages

303-310

Published online

2019-07-17

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0082

Pubmed

31322724

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):303-310.

Keywords

goblet cells
IgA
CD3+
small intestine
Huang-huai white goat

Authors

J. Zhou
W. Zhang
W. Liu
J. Sheng
M. Li
X. Chen
R. Dong

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