open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-26
Submitted: 2019-05-21
Accepted: 2019-08-03
Get Citation

Different fixative solutions in the detection of mast cells in the canine and feline reproductive organs

P. Hamouzova, P. Cizek, A. Bartoskova, R. Novotny
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0097
·
Pubmed: 31584179
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):265-271.

open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-26
Submitted: 2019-05-21
Accepted: 2019-08-03

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate the usability of different fixative fluids in the detection of mast cells in ovaries and uteri of female dogs and cats.

Materials and methods: Samples were fixed in 4% formaldehyde, Carnoy’s fluid, Mota’s basic lead acetate and isotonic formaldehyde-acetic acid (IFAA).

Results: Mast cells (MCs) were detected by acidified toluidine blue staining and counted for various parts of the ovaries and uteri. In the ovaries of both species, the numbers of MCs were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Carnoy than in formalin. No significant differences were found between Carnoy and Mota (tested only in cats). In the uterus, numbers of MCs were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Carnoy, Mota and IFAA compared to formalin (canine endometrium, feline endometrium and feline myometrium), in Carnoy and Mota compared to formalin (canine myometrium) and in Mota compared to IFAA (feline myometrium). The majority of MCs were formalin-sensitive in the canine and feline uterus, in the canine ovary and in the feline cortex ovarii. In the feline medulla ovarii, the majority of MCs were formalin-resistant. No formalin-resistant MCs were detected in the feline tunica albuginea ovarii.

Conclusions: Thus, using Mota‘s or Carnoy’s fluid in the canine or feline female reproductive organs is recommended. This study improves methodology for all studies which clarify the role of MCs in the reproductive organs of the domestic and laboratory animals.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate the usability of different fixative fluids in the detection of mast cells in ovaries and uteri of female dogs and cats.

Materials and methods: Samples were fixed in 4% formaldehyde, Carnoy’s fluid, Mota’s basic lead acetate and isotonic formaldehyde-acetic acid (IFAA).

Results: Mast cells (MCs) were detected by acidified toluidine blue staining and counted for various parts of the ovaries and uteri. In the ovaries of both species, the numbers of MCs were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Carnoy than in formalin. No significant differences were found between Carnoy and Mota (tested only in cats). In the uterus, numbers of MCs were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Carnoy, Mota and IFAA compared to formalin (canine endometrium, feline endometrium and feline myometrium), in Carnoy and Mota compared to formalin (canine myometrium) and in Mota compared to IFAA (feline myometrium). The majority of MCs were formalin-sensitive in the canine and feline uterus, in the canine ovary and in the feline cortex ovarii. In the feline medulla ovarii, the majority of MCs were formalin-resistant. No formalin-resistant MCs were detected in the feline tunica albuginea ovarii.

Conclusions: Thus, using Mota‘s or Carnoy’s fluid in the canine or feline female reproductive organs is recommended. This study improves methodology for all studies which clarify the role of MCs in the reproductive organs of the domestic and laboratory animals.

Get Citation

Keywords

Carnoy, dog, formol, Mota, ovary, uterus

About this article
Title

Different fixative solutions in the detection of mast cells in the canine and feline reproductive organs

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)

Pages

265-271

Published online

2019-08-26

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0097

Pubmed

31584179

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):265-271.

Keywords

Carnoy
dog
formol
Mota
ovary
uterus

Authors

P. Hamouzova
P. Cizek
A. Bartoskova
R. Novotny

References (38)
  1. Al-Zghoul MB, Al-Rukibat RK, Alghadi M, et al. Distribution and density of mast cells in camel small intestine and influence of fixation techniques. Eur J Histochem. 2008; 52(4): 237–241.
  2. Asti RN, Kurtdede A, Kurtdede N, et al. Mast cells in the dog skin: distribution, heterogeneity and influence of the fixation techniques. Ankara Univ Vet Fak Derg. 2005; 52: 7–12.
  3. Broome M, Villarreal B. Differential staining of mast cells with toluidine blue. J Histotechnol. 2012; 35(1): 27–30.
  4. Dong H, Wang Y, Zhang X, et al. Stabilization of brain mast cells alleviates LPS-induced neuroinflammation by inhibiting microglia activation. Front Cell Neurosci. 2019; 13: 191.
  5. Enerbäck L. Mast cells in rat gastrointestinal mucosa. I. Effects of fixation. Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1966; 66(3): 289–302.
  6. Garfield RE, Irani AM, Schwartz LB, et al. Structural and functional comparison of mast cells in the pregnant versus nonpregnant human uterus. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2006; 194(1): 261–267.
  7. Goericke-Pesch S, Schmidt B, Failing K, et al. Changes in the histomorphology of the canine cervix through the oestrous cycle. Theriogenology. 2010; 74(6): 1075–1081, 1081e1.
  8. Gurish MF, Austen KF. Developmental origin and functional specialization of mast cell subsets. Immunity. 2012; 37(1): 25–33.
  9. Hamouzova P, Cizek P, Bartoskova A, et al. Influence of oestradiol and progesterone levels on the number of mast cells in the feline myometrium. In: Cerkal R, Brezinova Belcredi N, Prokesova L, , editors:MendelNet 2017. Proceedings of 24th International PhD Students Conference. Mendel University in Brno, Brno. 2017: 691–695.
  10. Hamouzova P, Cizek P, Novotny R, et al. Distribution of mast cells in the feline ovary in various phases of the oestrous cycle. Reprod Domest Anim. 2017; 52(3): 483–486.
  11. Ivanisevic M, Segerer S, Rieger L, et al. Antigen-presenting cells in pregnant and non-pregnant human myometrium. Am J Reprod Immunol. 2010; 64(3): 188–196.
  12. Jensen F, Woudwyk M, Teles A, et al. Estradiol and progesterone regulate the migration of mast cells from the periphery to the uterus and induce their maturation and degranulation. PLoS One. 2010; 5(12): e14409.
  13. Jeziorska M, Salamonsen L, Woolley D. Mast cell and eosinophil distribution and activation in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle1. Biol Reprod. 1995; 53(2): 312–320.
  14. Karaca T, Arikan S, Kalender H, et al. Distribution and heterogeneity of mast cells in female reproductive tract and ovary on different days of the oestrus cycle in Angora goats. Reprod Domest Anim. 2008; 43(4): 451–456.
  15. Karaca T, Yörük M, Uslu S. Distribution and quantitative patterns of mast cells in ovary and uterus of rat. Arch Med Vet. 2007; 39(2): 135–139.
  16. Karaca T, Yörük M, Uslu S, et al. Distribution of eosinophil granulocytes and mast cells in the reproductive tract of female goats in the preimplantation phase. Vet Res Commun. 2009; 33(6): 545–554.
  17. Kube P, Audigé L, Küther K, et al. Bovine mast cells: distribution, density, heterogeneity, and influence of fixation techniques. Cell Tissue Res. 1998; 293(1): 111–119.
  18. Kürüm A, Özen A, Karahan S, et al. Investigation of mast cell distribution in the ovine oviduct during oestral and luteal phases of the oestrous cycles. Kafkas Univ Vet Fak Derg. 2014; 20: 915–920.
  19. Küther K, Audigé L, Kube P, et al. Bovine mast cells: distribution, density, heterogeneity, and influence of fixation techniques. Cell Tissue Res. 1998; 293(1): 111–119.
  20. Lee SKi, Kim CJ, Kim DJ, et al. Immune cells in the female reproductive tract. Immune Netw. 2015; 15(1): 16–26.
  21. Li Y, Yang T, Yao Q, et al. Metformin prevents colonic barrier dysfunction by inhibiting mast cell activation in maternal separation-induced IBS-like rats. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2019; 31(5): e13556.
  22. Lychkova AE, De Pasquale V, Avallone L, et al. Serotonin regulates contractile activity of the uterus in non-pregnant rabbits. Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2014; 165: 53–59.
  23. Menzies FM, Higgins CA, Shepherd MC, et al. Mast cells reside in myometrium and cervix, but are dispensable in mice for successful pregnancy and labor. Immunol Cell Biol. 2012; 90(3): 321–329.
  24. Meyer N, Santamaria CG, Müller JE, et al. Exposure to 17α-ethinyl estradiol during early pregnancy affects fetal growth and survival in mice. Environ Pollut. 2019; 251: 493–501.
  25. Meyer N, Woidacki K, Knöfler M, et al. Chymase-producing cells of the innate immune system are required for decidual vascular remodeling and fetal growth. Sci Rep. 2017; 7: 45106.
  26. Meyer N, Woidacki K, Maurer M, et al. Safeguarding of fetal growth by mast cells and natural killer cells: deficiency of one is counterbalanced by the other. Front Immunol. 2017; 8: 711.
  27. Meyer N, Schüler T, Zenclussen AC. Simultaneous ablation of uterine natural killer cells and uterine mast cells in mice leads to poor vascularization and abnormal doppler measurements that compromise fetal well-being. Front Immunol. 2018; 8: 1913.
  28. Meyer N, Zenclussen AC. Mast cells: good guys with a bad image? Am J Reprod Immunol. 2018; 80(4): e13002.
  29. Needham K, Fadia M, Dahlstrom JE, et al. Significance of mast cell distribution in placental tissue and membranes in spontaneous preterm birth. J Inflamm Res. 2016; 9: 141–145.
  30. Ozen A, Ergun L, Ergun E, et al. Morphological studies on ovarian mast cells in the cow. Turk J VetAnim Sci. 2007; 31: 131–136.
  31. Rieger J, Twardziok S, Huenigen H, et al. Porcine intestinal mast cells. Evaluation of different fixatives for histochemical staining techniques considering tissue shrinkage. Eur J Histochem. 2013; 57(3): e21.
  32. Salamonsen LA, Jeziorska M, Newlands GF, et al. Evidence against a significant role for mast cells in blastocyst implantation in the rat and mouse. Reprod Fertil Dev. 1996; 8(8): 1157–1164.
  33. Strobel S, Miller HR, Ferguson A. Human intestinal mucosal mast cells: evaluation of fixation and staining techniques. J Clin Pathol. 1981; 34(8): 851–858.
  34. Uslu S, Yörük M. Morfological and histometric studies on mast cell distribution and heterogeneity, present in the lower respiratory tract and in the lung of local duck (anas platyrhnchase) and goose (anser anser). Kafkas Univ Vet Fak Derg. 2013.
  35. Uslu SS, Yörük M. A morphological and histometric study on the distribution and heterogeneity of mast cells found in lungs and trachea of Van Cats. Ankara Univ Vet Fak Derg. 2015; 62(2): 87–91.
  36. Walls AF, Roberts JA, Godfrey RC, et al. Histochemical heterogeneity of human mast cells: disease-related differences in mast cell subsets recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage. Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol. 1990; 92(3): 233–241.
  37. Woidacki K, Popovic M, Metz M, et al. Mast cells rescue implantation defects caused by c-kit deficiency. Cell Death Dis. 2013; 4: e462.
  38. Woidacki K, Meyer N, Schumacher A, et al. Transfer of regulatory T cells into abortion-prone mice promotes the expansion of uterine mast cells and normalizes early pregnancy angiogenesis. Sci Rep. 2015; 5: 13938.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl