open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-02
Submitted: 2019-05-09
Accepted: 2019-07-02
Get Citation

Long head of biceps brachii tendon and transverse humeral ligament morphometry and their associated pathology

R. Khan, K. S. Satyapal, N. Naidoo, L. Lazarus
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0075
·
Pubmed: 31448814
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):359-365.

open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-02
Submitted: 2019-05-09
Accepted: 2019-07-02

Abstract

Background: As a dynamic stabiliser and flexor of the glenohumeral joint, the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBBT) is further stabilised by the retinacular activities of the transverse humeral ligament (THL).

Materials and methods: The LHBBT and THL which were obtained from a total of 40 cadaveric upper limb specimens (n = 80; females: 36, males: 44; right: 40, left: 40), were bilaterally dissected and subjected to morphometric evaluation.

Results: The results are in millimetres. LHBBT length: 81.99 ± 21.28 right, 79.73 ± 17.27 left; 79.82 ± 19.66 male, 82.14 ± 19.03 female; LHBBT width: 4.28 ± 1.31 right, 4.67 ± 1.43 left; 4.35 ± 1.17 male, 4.63 ± 1.60 female; THL length: 20.91 ± 5.24 right, 21.19 ± 6.63 left; 21.52 ± 5.71 male, 20.48 ± 5.92 female; THL width: 16.65 ± 6.92 right, 16.63 ± 7.49 left; 16.83 ± 6.65 male, 16.40 ± 7.84 female. With larger LHBBT length observed on the right side and larger LHBBT width observed on the left side; both parameters appeared to be distinctly longer in female individuals. On the contrary, the THL length and width were evidently greater in male individuals, with larger lengths and widths present on the left and right sides respectively.

Conclusions: These findings may contribute to South African literature and to clinical knowledge as these parameters are important in the successful outcomes of tenotomy, tenodesis and shoulder-related procedures.

Abstract

Background: As a dynamic stabiliser and flexor of the glenohumeral joint, the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBBT) is further stabilised by the retinacular activities of the transverse humeral ligament (THL).

Materials and methods: The LHBBT and THL which were obtained from a total of 40 cadaveric upper limb specimens (n = 80; females: 36, males: 44; right: 40, left: 40), were bilaterally dissected and subjected to morphometric evaluation.

Results: The results are in millimetres. LHBBT length: 81.99 ± 21.28 right, 79.73 ± 17.27 left; 79.82 ± 19.66 male, 82.14 ± 19.03 female; LHBBT width: 4.28 ± 1.31 right, 4.67 ± 1.43 left; 4.35 ± 1.17 male, 4.63 ± 1.60 female; THL length: 20.91 ± 5.24 right, 21.19 ± 6.63 left; 21.52 ± 5.71 male, 20.48 ± 5.92 female; THL width: 16.65 ± 6.92 right, 16.63 ± 7.49 left; 16.83 ± 6.65 male, 16.40 ± 7.84 female. With larger LHBBT length observed on the right side and larger LHBBT width observed on the left side; both parameters appeared to be distinctly longer in female individuals. On the contrary, the THL length and width were evidently greater in male individuals, with larger lengths and widths present on the left and right sides respectively.

Conclusions: These findings may contribute to South African literature and to clinical knowledge as these parameters are important in the successful outcomes of tenotomy, tenodesis and shoulder-related procedures.

Get Citation

Keywords

long head of biceps brachii tendon, transverse humeral ligament, tendinitis, tenodesis, morphometry

About this article
Title

Long head of biceps brachii tendon and transverse humeral ligament morphometry and their associated pathology

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 2 (2020)

Pages

359-365

Published online

2019-07-02

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0075

Pubmed

31448814

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(2):359-365.

Keywords

long head of biceps brachii tendon
transverse humeral ligament
tendinitis
tenodesis
morphometry

Authors

R. Khan
K. S. Satyapal
N. Naidoo
L. Lazarus

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